Aspire to be More

Aspire to be More

Aspire to be More

Aspire to be More

Aspire to be More

Art

Art

Art 1

ORGANISATION OF THE DEPARTMENT

The department consists of the following members of staff:

Mrs Kerry Amos – Head of Department (full time), responsible for:

  • Overall responsibility for Art and Design taught in the college
  • Aims and objectives
  • Formulating policy
  • Capitation
  • Discipline
  • Mentoring
  • Departmental administration
  • Departmental meetings
  • Public examinations
  • Implementation of the National Curriculum
  • Devising Schemes of Work for Ks 3,4 and 5
  • Ceramics specialism
  • Teaching KS 3 and 4
  • BTEC
  • Teaching 'A' Level students
  • Display
  • Literacy
  • Primary liaison
  • Able and Talented
  • Learning and Teaching group representative
  • Assessment
  • Analysis of data
  • ICT
  • Implementing new strategies

Mrs Nicola Crawford – Teacher of Art and Design (part time), responsible for:

  • Assistant to the Head of Department
  • Teaching KS3/4 students
  • Teaching 'A' Level students
  • Ceramics specialism
  • Numeracy
  • Display
  • Special Educational Needs
  • Assessment

Teacher of Music and Performing Arts. Responsible for:

  • Teaching year 7 and 9 students
  • Music specialism (has an A level in Art)
  • Assessment

Mr Brian Finney – Technician (1 day in art dept.), responsible for:

  • Preparation of equipment and materials
  • Organisation and maintenance of stock
  • Assisting in administrative tasks as appropriate
  • General assistance as deemed appropriate

ORGANISATION OF CLASSES/TEACHING GROUPS

Year 7 and 8 students are taught Art in their form classes.  Each member of the department generally teaches the same groups for the duration of the academic year.  However, it is sometimes beneficial to give another member of the department opportunity to teach an exam group, such as 'A' level.

ACCOMODATION

The department consists of two art rooms.  Both are used for 2D and 3D work, including ceramics. There are two storerooms and a kiln room.

RESOURCES

The department is equipped with ceramics equipment including an electric kiln, a pug machine, and a stone wedging slab.  There are also two electric mixers for glaze preparation.  Network cable points are available in both art areas and the department has 2 working computers, 2 printers, 2 lap tops, 2 Apple Mac book Pro's, 3 scanners.  Gimp, Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Painter XI, for both PC and Mac Book.  Other resources include ten display boards, papermaking facilities, 2 wax pots for batik, 1 sewing machine, 1 digital camera, 2 smart boards and a wide variety of materials such as paints, clay, inks etc.

All resources are the responsibility of the user and the Head of Department.  The resources will be used as and when appropriate within the department.

Curriculum aims of the department.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE ART DEPARTMENT

As appropriate, the aims and objectives of the Art Department relate directly to those of the college, and to the requirements of the National Curriculum.

'Art' should be interpreted throughout this document as 'Art, craft and design'.

AIMS:

1. To stimulate and/or maintain student curiosity, interest and enjoyment in Art.

2. To enable students to be familiar with a body of artistic knowledge, skills, principles and vocabulary, e.g. students should become competent and confident in:

i. producing images and 'works of art';

ii. responding to works produced by others, and to features of the natural and man-made environment, with reasoned arguments.

3. To employ teaching methods and resources that allow all students

(irrespective of their gender, ethnic origin, academic ability, etc.) to

have equal access to Art and to experience success and enjoyment in their work.

4. To develop an awareness in students of:

i. the implications of Art (past and present) for the individual and the local, national and international communities.

ii. the significance of Art and to value it as an important, pleasurable and fundamental realm of human experience.

5. To enable students to develop a range of desirable personal qualities such as safety awareness, politeness, perseverance, initiative and independence.

OBJECTIVES:

These objectives relate directly to the above aims and are intended to show how the aims are actually put into practice.

1. Staff should provide a variety of experiences/activities during a course of study.

2. The National Curriculum Key Stage 3 Orders and relevant GCSE/A Level requirements for art should be used as a basic core for the scheme of work. Staff should provide a glossary of words with eachtopic in order to aid correct spelling, understanding of the meanings of and the use of words.

- Staff should encourage students to recall and apply their knowledge and skills in both familiar and unfamiliar situations.

- The staff will allow opportunities at various times for group discussion.  At these times, we can listen to each other's views and hopefully reflect upon them.

- Students should be taught in a way that enables them to:

  • appreciate the diverse range of sources from which artists (craftspeople, designers) from different localities, generations and cultures derive their inspiration and ideas;
  • appreciate the qualities of various artistic materials so as to make appropriate selections when producing images and artefacts;
  • manipulate those materials, by the controlled use of suitable tools, equipment, techniques and processes, in order to produce intended effects;
  • experiment with and use knowledge of visual elements to design and make 'works of art' in a variety of media, genre and styles.  Their observations should be recorded.  Their work should display a variety of ideas and content.
  • Record and express their ideas and feelings as they perceive and respond to aspects of Art;
  • Recognise a variety of works and artists (craftspeople, designers) in the history of Art.
  • Understand some of the different criteria by which 'works of art' can be criticised and judged, and to employ those criteria when critically responding to, and making reasoned judgements about a variety of works from western and non-western cultures.

3. Lessons should be conducted in a secure, supportive and disciplined manner. The students and staff should interact in a manner that demonstrates mutual respect.

- Students should be introduced to a variety of experiences/activities during a course of study.  There should be opportunities for individual and/or group activities.

- Staff should use the rewards system to encourage students to work to their full potential and to experience a sense of achievement.

- Staff should attempt to spend time with each student during the course of a lesson.

- Students are to be encouraged to share their thoughts and experiences with others in order to enhance the quality of learning and use of subject specific language.

SCHEMES OF WORK

National Curriculum – Art and Design.

All schemes/units of work at KS3 reflect the guidelines and orders of the National Curriculum. As from 2007, all new schemes of work have ECM, Numeracy, Literacy and Citizenship embedded into them. (Many of these areas have been covered within past schemes of work but they will be made more obvious in the future) See SOW folders.

The scheme of work for KS3 is designed to enable pupils to progress in art and design from yr7 to yr 9.

The scheme builds on the knowledge, skills and understanding developed through the KS2 programme of study.  The expectation is that most pupils starting at KS3 are working at level 3, although the units take into account the fact that some pupils will be below or above that.

The department takes time to find out about pupil's experiences in art in primary schools by questioning the pupils.  We also give them base line testing in observational drawing skills and colour theory during the first term in yr 7 in week 2, as a starting point for them to monitor their progress.  This knowledge and understanding is assessed again at key points throughout the year.

At KS3, pupils develop their creativity and imagination through sustained activities that help them build on and improve their practical and critical skills.  They extend their knowledge and experience of materials, processes and practices.  They engage with art, craft and design in the contemporary world and from different times and cultures.  They become more independent in using the visual language to communicate their own ideas, feelings and meanings.

Below are extracts taken from the National Curriculum in Art and Design.

Curriculum aims

Learning and undertaking activities in art and design contribute to achievement of the curriculum aims for all young people to become:

  • successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve
  • confident individuals who are able to live safe, healthy and fulfilling lives
  • responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society.

The importance of Art and Design

In art, craft and design, pupils explore visual, tactile and other sensory experiences to communicate ideas and meanings. They work with traditional and new media, developing confidence, competence, imagination and creativity. They learn to appreciate and value images and artefacts across times and cultures, and to understand the contexts in which they were made. In art, craft and design, pupils reflect critically on their own and other people's work, judging quality, value and meaning. They learn to think and act as artists, craftspeople and designers, working creatively and intelligently. They develop an appreciation of art, craft and design, and its role in the creative and cultural industries that enrich their lives.

 

The Art and Design National Curriculum

1.Key concepts

There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of art, craft and design. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.

1.1 Creativity

  • Producing imaginative images, artefacts and other outcomes that are both original and of value.
  • Exploring and experimenting with ideas, materials, tools and techniques.
  • Taking risks and learning from mistakes.

1.2 Competence

  • Investigating, analysing, designing, making, reflecting and evaluating effectively.
  • Making informed choices about media, techniques and processes.

1.3 Cultural understanding

  • Engaging with a range of images and artefacts from different contexts, recognising the varied characteristics of different cultures and using them to inform their creating and making.
  • Understanding the role of the artist, craftsperson and designer in a range of cultures, times and contexts.

1.4 Critical understanding

  • Exploring visual, tactile and other sensory qualities of their own and others' work.
  • Engaging with ideas, images and artefacts, and identifying how values and meanings are conveyed.
  • Developing their own views and expressing reasoned judgements.
  • Analysing and reflecting on work from diverse contexts.

 

2. Key processes

These are the essential skills and processes in art, craft and design that pupils need to learn to make progress.

2.1 Explore and create

Pupils should be able to:

  • develop ideas and intentions by working from first-hand observation, experience, inspiration, imagination and other sources
  • investigate how to express and realise ideas using formal elements and the qualities of a range of media
  • make purposeful images and artefacts, selecting from a range of materials, techniques and processes
  • draw to express perception and invention, to communicate feelings, experiences and ideas, and for pleasure
  • explore and develop ideas using sketchbooks, journals and other appropriate strategies.

2.2 Understand and evaluate

Pupils should be able to:

  • use research and investigative skills appropriate to art, craft and design
  • appreciate how codes and conventions are used to convey ideas and meanings in and between different cultures and contexts
  • reflect on and evaluate their own and others' work, adapting and refining their own images and artefacts at all stages of the creative process
  • analyse, select and question critically, making reasoned choices when developing personal work
  • develop ideas and intentions when creating images and artefacts
  • organise and present their own material and information in appropriate forms.

 

3. Range and content

This section outlines the breadth of the subject on which teachers should draw when teaching the key concepts and key processes.

The study of art, craft and design should include:

  • work in, and across, the areas of fine art, craft and design, including both applied and fine art practices
  • exploration of media, processes and techniques in 2D, 3D and new technologies
  •  study of a range of artefacts from contemporary, historical, personal and cultural contexts
  • understanding of art, craft and design processes, associated equipment and safe working practices.

 

4. Curriculum opportunities

During the key stage pupils should be offered the following opportunities that are integral to their learning and enhance their engagement with the concepts, processes and content of the subject.

The curriculum should provide opportunities for pupils to:

  • work independently and collaboratively, taking different roles in teams
  • explore areas that are new to them, including ideas, techniques and processes
  • respond to the school's location and local cultural influences
  • engage with contemporary art, craft and design, working with creative and in creative environments where possible
  • work with a variety of genres, including contemporary practice
  • engage in interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary practice within the arts
  • make links between art and design and other subjects and areas of the curriculum.

 

National Curriculum

Level Indicators

Level 3

Pupils explore ideas and collect visual and other information for their work. They investigate visual and tactile qualities in materials and processes, communicate their ideas and meanings, and design and make images and artifacts for different purposes. They comment on similarities and differences between their own and others' work, and adapt and improve their own.

Level 4

Pupils use a variety of approaches to explore and experiment with ideas, information and resources in order to develop their intentions. They investigate and develop a range of practical skills and use the qualities of materials and processes purposefully to suit their intentions when designing and making. They compare and comment on differing ideas, methods and approaches used by artists, craftspeople and designers, relating these to the contexts in which the work was made.  They discuss their own work and that of others and consider how they might adapt and refine their ideas, skills and processes.

Level 5

Pupils take some creative risks when exploring, experimenting and responding to ideas and selecting information and resources in order to develop their work. When designing and making, they develop and use their technical knowledge and skills to manipulate the qualities of materials, processes and the formal elements appropriately. They consider and discuss the ideas, methods and approaches that are used by artists, craftspeople and designers, relating these to both context and purpose. They evaluate their own work and that of others, reflecting on their own view of its purpose and meaning. They are able to adapt and refine their ideas, processes and intentions.

Level 6

Pupils accept creative risks, exploring and experimenting with ideas independently and inventively and using a range of appropriate resources imaginatively to develop, design and make work. They apply their technical knowledge and skills to realise their intentions, using the qualities of materials, processes and the formal elements effectively. They interpret and explain how ideas and meanings are conveyed by artists, craftspeople and designers, recognising the varied characteristics of different historical, social and cultural contexts. They provide a reasoned evaluation of the  purpose and meaning of their own work and that of others. They use their critical understanding to develop their own views and practice.

Level 7

Pupils learn from taking creative risks that help them to form and develop their ideas and to create purposeful, imaginative work with some originality. They demonstrate confident understanding and use of materials, processes and the formal elements, combining these thoughtfully to realise their intentions. They analyse and comment on their own and others' work, appreciating how codes and conventions are used to express ideas in different genres, styles and traditions. They explain how and why their understanding of the work of others affects their own ideas, values and practice.

Level 8

Pupils develop, express and realise ideas in often original ways, confidently exploiting what they learn from taking creative risks and from their understanding of creative processes. They exploit the potential of materials and processes independently, making both intuitive and analytical judgements to develop and realise their intentions. They analyse, engage with, and question critically aspects of their own and others' work, identifying how beliefs, values and meanings are expressed and shared. They confidently express reasoned judgements about their own work and that of others, demonstrating analytical, critical and contextual understanding.

 

Exceptional performance

Pupils are in command of their creative practice, recognising and using a variety of strategies to develop ideas that are personal, original and imaginative. They use the differing qualities and potential of materials and processes with deliberation and maturity in order to create work that successfully fulfils their intentions. They critically engage with their own and others' work, identifying why ideas and meanings are subject to different interpretations and using their understanding to extend their thinking and practical work. They extend their ideas and sustain their investigations by responding to new possibilities and meanings. They communicate their own ideas, insights and views.

 

SCHEME OF WORK YEAR 7

GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO THE ART DEPARTMENT – YEAR 7

The general ability and prior experience of the pupils will be assessed using simple introductory topics and discussion, as mentioned previously.  One can expect a certain variability in standard and experience with pupils coming into the college from a variety of feeder schools, although this has declined as the effects of introducing the National Curriculum for Art in the feeder schools have made themselves felt.  Naturally there will still be substantial diversity of experience and expertise of the individual.

The first year will include the following:

  • Introduction to the department.
  • Introduction to department standards.
  • Safety aspects of the materials and equipment used within the department.
  • Drawing equipment and its potential.
  • An emphasis on the correct use of departmental material and the importance of a professional approach to the subject.
  • Each yr 7 student will be tested on their drawing ability and colour theory knowledge, at the beginning of term.  This will then be used to set targets against and to measure progression.
  • Importance will be placed on quality of work rather than quantity.
  • A reasonable amount of theoretical work will be covered within the practical lessons, and this may be reinforced with occasional written notes.
  • Students will be encouraged to experiment with a variety of media whilst developing expertise within a more limited range of media
  • The work of artists, craftspeople and designers will be introduced, linked to the practical work that takes place.
  • All pupils will be encouraged to work to the highest standard of which they are capable.  The nature of the work in this subject allows for great flexibility of differentiation between pupils of varying abilities.  Much of the teaching is on a one to one basis, which allows us to cater for the more able, as well as the least able whilst delivering the same/similar material to all.
  • Units of work will vary from single lessons to projects lasting up to a term.  These can be interlinked and will often develop as a result of pupils own ideas and needs.
  • Pupils will be encouraged to develop the use of art specific language and to engage in discussions relating to their own work and the work of others.
  •  Students will be encouraged to experiment with a variety of media whilst developing expertise within a more limited range of media
  • The work of artists, craftspeople and designers will be introduced, linked to the practical work that takes place.
  • All pupils will be encouraged to work to the highest standard of which they are capable.  The nature of the work in this subject allows for great flexibility of differentiation between pupils of varying abilities.  Much of the teaching is on a one to one basis, which allows us to cater for the more able, as well as the least able whilst delivering the same/similar material to all.
  • Units of work will vary from single lessons to projects lasting up to a term.  These can be interlinked and will often develop as a result of pupils own ideas and needs.
  • Pupils will be encouraged to develop the use of art specific language and to engage in discussions relating to their own work and the work of others.

 

 SCHEME OF WORK – YEAR 7

During the first year the basic elements of art will be considered a priority.  This will include -  tone, line, shape, texture, and colour.  These aspects will be included in:

  • Introduction to use of pencils and other drawing equipment and commencement of drawing techniques, e.g., tone – using the effects of light on 3D geometric type objects.
  • Introduction to painting materials, use of brush, paint etc. and commencement of painting techniques, e.g. Discussion of different types of equipment and the purposes that each is best suited for.
  • Introduction to use of colour theory and colour mixing with different types of media incorporated into the work.
  • Introduction of still life drawing, e.g. Commencing with basic shapes such as cubes, cylinders and spheres and later developing these structures into everyday objects.
  • Appropriate investigation into artists' works will be related to units.

 

Aspects of 3D (card construction, clay, etc.) will be explored and the course will include the basic knowledge required of materials and their working properties.  Health and safety precautions will play an integral role in the course.  Please see Scheme of Work documents.

 

SCHEME OF WORK YEAR 8 

Skills that have been learnt during year 7 will be further developed in year eight. New ideas and skills in a wide range of 2D and 3D media are to be introduced through the units of work, which can be seen in the department's 'Scheme of Work', folder. All aspects of the course relate to National Curriculum orders. There will also be opportunities for collaborative group work.

 

SCHEME OF WORK YEAR 9

As from 2006, those pupils who have opted to study Art have followed a Foundation Course (devised by the Art Department).  All aspects of the course still reflect the requirements of the National Curriculum.  For a detailed breakdown of the course see Yr 9 Foundation Course Scheme of Work.

The course allows pupils to take part in a series of workshop based projects whereby they will be able to experience and experiment with a diverse range of art, craft and design techniques and materials.  Many disciplines will be covered and a large range of work by practitioners will be used as inspiration.

This will build on pupils' previous experiences and also introduce new skills. As a result of this, it is anticipated that pupils will work with a higher level of understanding and increased confidence at GCSE level. Each project is designed to develop independent creative thinking skills, an aspect which will be vital to a successful GCSE. Students are assessed using the KS3 National Curriculum.

 

BTEC First Level 2 Art and Design

Extended Certificate and Certificate

 During the Autumn Term 2010-2011 the department introduced a BTEC course to all Year 9, 10 and 11 students. It was my vision that during year 9 and 10, Art students will complete the BTEC which is worth the equivalent of 2 GCSE’s. At the beginning of Year 11 students were to be offered the OCR GCSE course. Students who had not yet completed the BTEC would not be entered for OCR course as they needed to complete the BTEC course.

As the introduction of this course is in its infancy then we were very flexible with the students as we get to grips with the new criteria. We became a part of the Consortium for Stoke-on-Trent and were provided with appropriate projects. We began to deliver the course after the October half term 2010 to all 3 year groups. Head of Department attended other schools in the City to see examples of good practise and examples of Pass, Merit and Distinction work. This was regularly shared at consortium meetings. As a result of this first year’s trial, Mrs Amos joined the working party to improve the delivery of the course.

 

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Art and Design

(Equivalent to 1 GCSE grade)

15 Credits = 90- guided-learning-hours (GLH)

The qualification consists of one mandatory unit PLUS optional units that provide for a combined total of 15 credits (where at least 8 credits must be Level 2 or above).

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Art and Design
Unit

 

Credit Level
1 Contextual References in Art and Design 10 2
Unit Optional Units    
2 2D Visual Communication 5 2
3 3D Visual Communication 5 2

 

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Art and Design

 

(Equivalent to 2 GCSE grades)

30 Credits = 180- guided-learning-hours (GLH)

The qualification consists of three mandatory units PLUS optional units that provide for a combined total of 30 credits (where at least 16 credits must be Level 2 or above).

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Art and Design
Unit
Mandatory units
Credit
Level
1
Contextual References in Art and Design
10
2
2
2D Visual Communication
5
2
3
3D Visual Communication
5
2
Unit
Optional Units
 
 
4
Using Ideas to Explore, Develop and Produce Art and Design
10
2
5
Building an Art and Design Portfolio
5
2
6
Working in the Art and Design Industry
5
2
7
Working with Graphic Design Briefs
10
2
8
Working with Photography Briefs
10
2
9
Working with Fashion Design Briefs
10
2
10
Working with Textiles Briefs
10
2
11
Working with 3DDesign Briefs
10
2
12
Working with Interactive Media Briefs
10
2
13
Working with Visual Arts Briefs
10
2
14
Working with 3D Design Crafts Briefs
10
2
15
Working with Digital Art and Design Briefs
10
2
16
Working with Accessory Briefs
10
2
17
Working with Moving Image Briefs
10
2
18
Working with Site Specific Briefs
10
2

In BTEC Firsts, all units are internally assessed.

 All assessment for BTEC First qualifications is criterion referenced, based on the achievement of all the specified learning outcomes.

Each unit within the qualification has specified assessment and grading criteria which are to be used for grading purposes. A summative unit grade can be awarded at Pass, Merit or distinction:

  • To achieve a ‘pass’ a learner must have satisfied ALL the pass assessment criteria
  • To achieve a ‘merit’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the merit grading criteria
  • To achieve a ‘distinction’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the grading distinction criteria

Grading Domains

The assessment grading criteria are developed in relation to grading domains which are exemplified by a number of indicative characteristics at the level of the qualification.

There are four BTEC First grading domains:

  • Application of knowledge and understanding
  • Development of practical and technical skills
  • Personal development for occupational roles
  • Application of generic skills

SCHEME OF WORK – GCSE – YEARS 10 AND 11

All students opting for Art in years 10 and 11 will follow courses to GCSE examination standard. The course will include a more advanced development of the principles of Art already introduced in the previous years. The full content of the GCSE syllabus is laid out in the O.C.R Art and Design Syllabus, which is available from the Head of Art. We place more emphasis on ‘Independent Learning’ at this stage and endeavour to provide a course which is both challenging and accessible to all levels of ability.

Below are extracts from the OCR GCSE syllabus:

Aims and Learning Outcomes

The aims of these specifications are to encourage candidates to:

-Actively engage in the process of art and design in order to develop as effective and independent candidates and as critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds.

- Develop creative skills, through learning to use imagination and intuition when exploring and creating images and artefacts. Become confident in taking risks and learning from their mistakes when exploring and experimenting with ideas, materials, tools and techniques.

- Develop competence, with increasing independence, in refining and developing ideas and proposals, and personal outcomes or solutions. Learning to actively engage with the experience of working with a broad range of media, materials and techniques including, where appropriate, traditional and new media and technologies.

- Develop cultural knowledge, understanding and application of art, craft, design, media and technologies in historical and contemporary contexts, societies and cultures. Also, develop an understanding of the different roles, functions, audiences and consumers of art, craft and design practice.

- Develop critical understanding through investigative, analytical, experimental, interpretive, practical, technical and expressive skills.

- Develop personal attributes including self-confidence, resilience, perseverance, self-discipline and commitment.

 These specifications further provide opportunities for candidates to gain:

- a personal interest in why art and design matters and be inspired, moved and changed by studying a broad, coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study;

- experience of working within real and relevant frameworks;

- experience of the work practices of individuals, organisations and creative and cultural industries;

- understanding of art, craft and design processes and associated equipment and safe working practices.

The GCSE in Art and Design conforms to the regulations laid down within the Art and Design subject criteria (QCA 2007).

From September 2009 these GCSEs in Art and Design each require candidates to complete two mandatory units.

The GCSEs in Art and Design are organised into one unendorsed route (combining areas of study) and sevenspecialist focused areas of study (endorsements) as follows:

Fine Art

Graphic Communication

Photography – Lens- and Light-based Media

Textile Design

Three-dimensional Design

Critical and Contextual Studies

Applied

Candidates can take the unendorsed route if they want to submit work for more than one area of study. However candidates can choose one specialist focused endorsement if they want to restrict their research and outcome to one area of study.

Candidates may be entered for one or more Art and Design GCSEs. For example a candidate might choose to do two GCSEs such as the GCSE in Art and Design: Applied and the GCSE in Art and Design: Textile Design. Alternatively they might choose an unendorsed GCSE in Art and Design with the GCSE in Art and Design: Critical and Contextual Studies, and so on. Where candidates choose to take two separate GCSEs, they must submit separate supporting evidence and separate outcome(s) for each unit within each of the different GCSEs.

Course followed by students:

OCR GCSE in Art and Design: Fine Art

Unit 1: Art and Design Portfolio (A111)

Unit 2: Art and Design OCR-set Task (A121)

Unit 1 (A110 – A117): Art and Design Portfolio

 

                Candidates produce a portfolio of work developed from personal and/or centre-devised starting points, or briefs/projects/assignments within a client-focused context.

               The focus is on including work that shows exploration, research, acquisition of techniques and skills.

                This is produced under the Controlled Assessment conditions that are specified in Section 5.

                Candidates will be given up to a maximum of 45 hours in which to complete their Controlled Assessment portfolio.

 

Unit 2 (A120 – A127): Art and Design OCR-set Task

 

                Candidates select one question from an early release question paper to which they produce a personal response.

                Candidates will be given a period of time in which to plan and prepare as determined by the centre.

                Candidates will be given ten hours of controlled time in which to work on developing their ideas to outcome(s); at least one of the timetabled sessions must last for a minimum of three hours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 1 (A110 – A117): Art and Design Portfolio

Candidates need to produce a portfolio of work for this unit that demonstrates a personal response to starting points, briefs, scenarios or stimuli. Centres must set their own starting points, briefs, scenarios or stimuli. OCR-produced exemplar material is provided to help centres design and set their own starting points, briefs, scenarios or stimuli but this material must not be used for assessment purposes.

A portfolio is formed from work that is produced in response to the candidate’s chosen starting point, brief, scenario or stimulus. The portfolio should be produced using the Controlled Assessment conditions outlined in Section 5. Candidates’ work within the portfolio should provide evidence of meeting all assessment objectives; this includes research, preparatory and developmental studies and their outcome(s).

For the purposes of assessment, candidates will provide evidence of all the assessment objectives through the careful selection and presentation of their work. The portfolio should be viewed as a whole and judgements regarding the extent to which all of the assessment objectives have been met should be made across the portfolio as a whole.

The portfolio will consist of a sustained project, theme or course of study. It may be presented in an appropriate format for the area of study using, for example, annotated sketchbooks, mounted sheets, maquettes, prototypes, scale models or written work.

Unit 2 (A120 – A127): Art and Design OCR-set Task

The OCR-set Task

For this unit, an early release question paper will be dispatched to centres based on provisional entries made, and will also be available on the OCR website in January. This paper can be given to candidates at the discretion of centres any time on or after 1 January. Centres may determine the amount of time for preparatory study prior to candidates undertaking their supervised, ten-hour set task.

The OCR-set task will give candidates a choice of questions in the form of written and/or visual starting points, briefs, scenario or stimuli. From this paper, candidates are expected to choose one question for which they will generate an appropriate personal response for assessment and moderation. Please see the Specimen Assessment Material for an example of the OCR-set task.

Planning and Preparation

Candidates must be given a preparatory period during which they will research, plan and develop ideas for their own personal response to the starting point or brief they have chosen. During this time teachers may give limited guidance. Guidance should be given to candidates about availability and choice of materials, health and safety, avoidance of plagiarism and completion of work in accordance with specification requirements and procedures. However, it should be remembered that candidates are required to reach their own judgements and conclusions and must work independently to produce their own personal response. The majority of work should be carried out in the centre during normal teaching time.

All work must be completed by the designated finishing time set by the centre. This deadline, along with dates and deadlines for preparatory work and the supervised ten-hour OCR-set task must be set by centres in order to facilitate the completion of marking and internal standardisation by the 15 May deadline.

Realising intentions

Candidates will have up to ten hours in which to independently realise their personal response. The ten hours can be divided into a number of sessions and timetabled to suit the centre; at least one of the timetabled sessions must last for a minimum of three hours. Centres should ensure that the most appropriate approach to these supervised periods of sustained focus is adopted. Very short sessions should be avoided. Candidates must not have access to their work between sessions, nor once the ten hours of timed assessment have been completed. For regulations governing examinations, centres should consult the OCR Administration Guide for General Qualifications, or the JCQ document, General and Vocational Qualifications: Instructions for Conducting Examinations.

Candidates are required to provide evidence of all assessment objectives in response to their chosen starting point, brief, scenario or stimulus, within a supervised ten-hour time limit. It is expected that during this supervised ten-hour period, candidates will realise their intentions to an outcome; this may be a potential solution, a maquette or prototype, or a finished piece. All work produced for the OCR-set task, including the research, planning and development work produced in the preparatory period must be submitted for assessment and moderation.

Presenting the personal response

Candidates are expected to evidence all of the assessment objectives whilst producing work for this unit. Candidates should select and present their own work for assessment purposes from the work that they have undertaken in response to this unit.

Candidates must observe certain procedures in the production of their personal response for the externally-set task.

• Any source material must be suitably acknowledged.

• Quotations must be clearly marked and a reference provided wherever possible.

• Work submitted for assessment and moderation should be labelled clearly with:

Centre number and name

Candidate number and name

Unit code

Title of candidate’s work indicating the starting point, brief, scenario or stimulus chosen

Outcome(s) clearly identified.

Assessment and Moderation

In order to assess personal responses produced during the supervised ten-hour period, assessors must be able to authenticate candidates’ work. Centres are advised to ensure that candidates have been informed about the avoidance of plagiarism and completion of work in accordance with specification requirements and procedures.

Authentication

Assessors must be confident that the work they mark is the candidate’s own. This does not mean that a candidate must be supervised throughout the completion of all work but the teacher must exercise sufficient supervision, or introduce sufficient checks, to be in a position to authenticate a candidate’s work.

Assessors should ensure that candidates are aware that they must not submit work for assessment that is not their own or lend their work to other candidates. Plagiarism is the submission of another’s work as one’s own and/or failure to acknowledge the source correctly. Plagiarism is considered to be malpractice and could lead to the candidate being disqualified. Plagiarism sometimes occurs innocently when candidates are unaware of the need to reference or acknowledge their sources. It is therefore important that centres ensure that candidates understand that the work they submit must be their own and that they understand the meaning of plagiarism and what penalties may be applied. Candidates may refer to research, quotations or evidence but they must list their sources. The rewards from acknowledging sources, and the credit they will gain from doing so, should be emphasised to candidates as well as the potential risks of failing to acknowledge such material. Candidates should be asked to sign a declaration to confirm that the work they submit is their own; this should be kept securely by the centre. Assessors should reinforce this message to ensure candidates understand what is expected of them.

Candidates’ work for Unit 2 (A120 – A127): Art and Design OCR-set Task should be marked by the centre assessor according to the marking criteria, using a ‘best fit’ approach. The award of marks must be directly related to the marking criteria. Centre assessors use their professional judgement in selecting the descriptor that best describes the work of the candidate to place them within the appropriate band for each assessment objective strand. Marks should then be awarded as outlined below.

Where the candidate’s work

convincingly meets the descriptor, the highest mark within the band should be awarded

adequately meets the descriptor, the most appropriate mark in the middle range of the band should be awarded

just meets the descriptor, the lowest mark in the band should be awarded

fails to meet any aspect of the descriptor within the lowest band then zero marks should be awarded.

The candidate’s final mark is out of a total of 100 and is arrived at by totalling the marks awarded for each assessment objective.

Assessment and internal standardisation needs to be completed in time to submit marks to OCR by the deadline of 15 May. Once marked, and internally standardised, all work must be retained by the centre for the external moderation visit. All candidate work must be retained securely within the centre until candidates’ results are issued and the centre is certain that no Result Enquiry or Appeal process is required.

Use of New Media

Any of OCR’s Art and Design GCSEs can be approached using traditional media, new media or a combination of both, providing all assessment objectives are met. Candidates may explore the possibilities of using new media and use new media where appropriate within the work they develop and produce.

 

Many artists and designers now use new media to develop ideas and produce work, particularly those who work commercially. Such artists and designers, along with the processes and techniques they use, might be usefully explored by candidates. This might be achieved by accessing online galleries, having access to appropriate hardware and software, exploring the possibilities of e-portfolio use, visits to commercial art and design departments or by inviting visiting speakers such as local artists and designers or employees from local art and design companies.

Candidates may produce and submit practical work for Unit A120: Art and Design OCR-set Task that shows evidence of their work in one of their chosen areas of study.

Candidates taking the combined areas of study route should be encouraged to explore processes, materials and techniques that are appropriate to the chosen areas of study, in a range of practical ways. Candidates could work in a multimedia way: for example, their portfolio could reflect the relationship between figurative drawing and painting and graphic design (combining Fine Art and Graphic Communication), or photographic portraits and fabric design (combining Photography – Lens- and Light-based Media with Textile Design).

At least two areas of study must be evident in a candidate’s outcome(s), as well as their preparatory work. A candidate could submit one outcome that incorporates two different areas of study. Alternatively, a candidate could submit two or more final outcomes each focusing on one of their chosen areas of study, linked by a common theme or stimulus.

Fine Art

OCR GCSE in Art and Design: Fine Art – J161

Classification Code 3690

In response to their chosen activities in Fine Art, candidates will be expected to demonstrate skills through their response to their chosen starting point, scenario or stimulus. A variety of processes and techniques can be explored when using differing approaches to making images and/or objects.

Candidates should demonstrate an expressive and personal response in their work, appropriate for the given task or stimuli, from two or more of the activities listed below.

Painting: Candidates should explore the use of tone, colour, composition, materials and context. Candidates can show this through the use of various processes and media, such as inks, acrylic, watercolour or oil paints.

Drawing: Candidates should be encouraged, to work from direct observation to explore drawing using line and tone. They should also be encouraged to explore a wide variety of drawing materials using different surfaces. Drawing materials might include pastel, pencil, pen and ink, paint, charcoal or other materials.

Printmaking: Candidates should explore a variety of printmaking techniques and produce either a series of related images or one-off prints using methods such as linocut, etching, monoprinting, or screen printing.

Sculpture: Candidates should explore form, space, mass and volume. They should use a range of processes and materials such as carving, modelling, casting, or constructing.

Lens-based imagery: Candidates should explore approaches to the production of still and/or moving images using appropriate techniques, processes and equipment such as traditional dark room methods, digital photography, image manipulation, film, animation, or other new media.

Other forms of two-dimensional or three-dimensional imagery: Using traditional or new media, candidates can also produce work for assessment in any other 2D or 3D form such as collage, assemblage, or textiles. Candidates may employ mixed media or use of improvised or waste materials for collage or constructional purposes to create work.

ICT

In order to play a full part in modern society, candidates need to be confident and effective users of ICT. Where appropriate, candidates should be given opportunities to use ICT in order to further their study of art and design.

The assessment of this course allows candidates to use ICT if appropriate. Where candidates have used ICT they are expected to:

• Present evidence that clearly shows any appropriate use of ICT for research purposes, such as visiting gallery web sites and the use of CD-ROMs

• Provide clear evidence of the use of ICT to further develop their own work through use of commercial software, for activities such as:

Image creation (still and moving image)

Image manipulation (still and moving image)

Digital photography (still and moving image)

Electronic storage and retrieval.

Where candidates have not created the initial source material themselves, clear reference should be made as to its original source, for example:

Clip art

Imagery downloaded from the internet

Scanning from secondary sources.

 

4.1 GCSE Art and Design Scheme of Assessment

Unit 1 (A110 – A117): Art and Design Portfolio

 

 

60% of the total GCSE Art and Design marks

Controlled Assessment

 

Maximum of 45 hrs to complete the portfolio

 

100 marks

 

 

For this unit a candidate needs to produce a portfolio of work showing their personal response to either a starting point, brief, scenario, or stimulus devised and provided by the centre.

Candidates have up to 45 hours in which to produce their portfolio.

This unit is internally assessed and externally moderated by OCR.

Unit 2 (A120 – A127): Art and Design OCR-set Task

 

 

 

40% of the total GCSE Art and Design marks

Question paper issued to candidates on or after 1 January

 

 

Unlimited preparatory period

10 hrs supervised OCR-set task

 

 

 

100 marks

The early release question paper will be issued in January and will provide candidates with a range of written and visual starting points, briefs, scenarios and stimuli. From these one must be selected upon which to base their personal response.

Candidates will have a preparatory period determined by the centre, followed by a supervised ten-hour period in which to complete their personal response outcome(s). One timetabled session must last for at least 3 hours.

This unit is internally assessed and externally moderated by OCR.

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade Descriptions

Grade descriptions are provided to give a general indication of the standards of achievement likely to have been shown by candidates awarded particular grades. The descriptions must be interpreted in relation to the content in the specification; they are not designed to define that content. The grade awarded will depend in practice upon the extent to which the candidate has met the assessment objectives overall. Shortcomings in some aspects of the assessment may be balanced by better performance in others.

The grade descriptors have been produced by the regulatory authorities in collaboration with the awarding bodies.

Grade F

Candidates develop and explore ideas through experimentation. They make an attempt to analyse and evaluate images, artefacts and products, and in their responses show evidence of a modest understanding of culture and context.  

They make an attempt to refine and modify their work as it progresses. They use media, material, techniques and processes with some control and understanding. They demonstrate some ability to combine the knowledge, skills and understanding they have developed.

They select and record observations in a direct way and draw upon their experiences.

They present ideas with a basic understanding of the links between form and intention. They make a personal response, endeavouring to realise intentions, and seek to make connections between their own work and that of others.

Grade C

Candidates effectively develop and explore ideas through considered investigations. They analyse and evaluate images, artefacts and products with a clear sense of purpose. They demonstrate a suitably broad understanding of context and culture, which inform developing responses.

They refine their ideas and select and employ a range of resources, media, material, techniques and processes appropriately. They combine their knowledge, skills and understanding in a generally appropriate and accomplished manner. They understand the relationship between process and product, and demonstrate growing ability to review, modify and refine their work as it progresses.

They demonstrate the necessary skills to effectively record and respond to observations and experiences.

They present ideas and the results of their research and enquiry competently in forms that are consistent with intentions. They make connections with the work of others, which inform personal responses and support the realisation of intentions.

Grade A

Candidates creatively develop and explore ideas through investigations. They sustain related activity perceptively and effectively analyse and evaluate images, artefacts and products. Responses, interpretations and subsequent developments are thoughtfully informed by an understanding of culture and context.

They thoughtfully develop and refine their ideas through experimentation, confidently manipulating and exploiting a wide range of relevant resources, media, material, techniques and processes. They combine their knowledge, skills and understanding in resourceful, discriminating and purposeful ways. Significant relationships are established between process and product through continuing evaluation, planning and modification as their work progresses.

They sensitively and skilfully record ideas and interpret observations and experiences.

They present imaginative and personal responses, communicating the results of thorough research and enquiry in appropriate forms that clearly relate to and facilitate the realisation of intentions. They make perceptive and informed connections between personal lines of enquiry and the work of others.

SCHEME OF WORK – AS/A2 LEVEL – YEARS 12 AND 13

All candidates opting for AS/A2 level Art and Design will follow the AQA syllabus. Students will be expected to produce units of work similar to those required at GCSE level, but developed to a much higher level. There will also be a written element, which is a compulsory requirement of the course.

With the increased amount of work and time spent in the department, the candidates will be expected to develop their own personal style, professional ability, skill and ability to work independently producing regular quantities of high quality work, including work that is done in their own time. Students are welcome to be in the art rooms at any time when there is sufficient space for them to work. They are also expected to spend one extra study per week engaged in art related activities.

Both AS and A2 students took part in a visit to London this year. They visited the Victoria and Albert Museum and Tate Modern. We felt that it was a super opportunity to give students first hand experiences with both very modern art and that of a more craft based nature. All students complete a sketchbook/journal of their visit and how the visit will influence their own development.

The following is taken from the AQA specification

3.7 Art, Craft and Design (ARTA)

Introduction

Candidates should be introduced to a variety of experiences exploring a range of two- and/or three dimensional media, processes and techniques. They should be made aware of both traditional and new technologies.

Candidates should explore relevant images, artefacts and resources relating to a range of art, craft and design, from the past and from recent times, including European and non-European examples. This should be integral to the investigating and making process. Their responses to these examples must be shown through practical and critical activities which demonstrate the candidates’ understanding of different styles, genres and traditions.

Candidates should be aware of the four assessment objectives to be demonstrated in the context of the content and skills presented and of the importance of process as well as product.

Candidates should explore drawing using a variety of methods and media on a variety of scales.

Candidates should use sketchbooks/workbooks/ journals to underpin their work where appropriate.

 Areas of Study

Candidates are required to work in at least two of the following areas of Art and Design. They may explore overlapping areas and combinations of areas.

  • Fine Art
  • Graphic Communication
  •  Textile Design
  •  Three-Dimensional Design
  •  Photography: lens-based and light-based media

Skills and Techniques

Candidates will be expected to demonstrate skills, as defined in Section 3.5 of this specification, in the context of their chosen areas of study. Candidates will work in at least two areas drawn from the following:

Fine Art: painting; drawing; mixed media, sculpture; land art; installation; printmaking; film; animation; television; video and photography: lens-based and light-based media. (See also Section 3.8.)

SKETCHBOOKS

The use of sketchbooks is seen as an important part of AS/A2 work. They enable you to build a personal engagement with the subject. They can be used in a variety of ways, including:

  • for recording what is seen, remembered or imagined
  • for close observation or analysis
  • for exploring and resolving problems
  • for personal evaluations of your work and artist’s work
  • for recording events and situations
  • as a two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional form
  • for making proposals
  • as a visual and written diary
  • for jotting down ideas quickly
  • as a collection of images

 The following Aims and Assessment Objectives are taken from the AQA Specification booklet.

AIMS

The aims identify the educational purposes of AS and A Level Art and Design. They are the same for both AS and A Level.

A course based on this specification should encourage candidates to develop:

a)intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive powers;

b)investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills, aesthetic understanding and critical judgement;

c)an understanding of the interrelationships between art, craft and design and an awareness of the contexts in which they operate;

d)knowledge and understanding of art, craft and design in contemporary society and in other times and cultures.

GCE Art and Design (2200) 

Important notice – July 2008

The AS and A Level certification codes for the new GCE Art and Design (2200) specification have changed as follows:

 

Page 4

AS Award:

1201A–1206F

A Level award:

2201A–2206F

Page 23

AS certification:

1201A, 1202B, 1203C, 1204D, 1205E and 1206F

A Level certification:

2201A, 2202B, 2203C, 2204D, 2205E and 2206F

 

Introduction

 Introducing AQA's new course specification for Art and Design for AS and A Level. This new specification has been designed to:

  • enable candidates to develop personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences, environments and cultures
  • extend the existing flexibility to allow students and teachers to work from their strengths
  • provide an appropriate foundation for further study of Art and Design or related subjects in Higher Education 

The following information and specification outline will enable both practising Teachers and Subject Heads to be better informed and supported in the teaching of this subject, particularly if attending one of AQA's Teacher Support meetings. 

Classification Codes

Every specification is assigned a national classification codes indicating the subject area to which it belongs. The classification code for this specification are:

  • Art and Design 3510

Centres should be aware that candidates who enter for more than one GCE AS/A level qualification with the same classification code will have only one grade (the highest) counted for the purpose of the School and College Performance Tables.

Centres may wish to advise candidates that, if they take two specifications with the same classification code, universities and employers are very likely to take the view that they have achieved only one of the two GCE AS/A levels. The same view may be taken if candidates take two GCE AS/A level specifications that have different classification codes but have significant overlap of content. Candidates who have any doubts about their subject combinations should check with the university to which they wish to progress or company they wish to join, before embarking on their programmes.

The AS outline

The AS specification has 2 units:

it 1 Portfolio

Topic list

Development of a coursework portfolio exemplifying work carried out during the AS course.

Assessment

Coursework 80 marks
Weighting: 50% of total AS marks / 25% of total A Level marks

Candidates choose one of the endorsements for study throughout AS. The contents of the Portfolio will be determined by the nature of the course of study.

Candidates should produce a collection of materials which exemplifies work carried out during the AS course.

All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole.

Set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

3.1 Unit 1 ARTA1, ARTB1, ARTC1, ARTD1, ARTE1, ARTF1

Coursework Portfolio

Candidates choose one of the endorsements for study throughout AS. The contents of the Portfolio will be determined by the nature of the course of study.

Candidates should produce a collection of materials which exemplifies work carried out during the AS course.

Candidates may submit in their portfolio:

• A selection of thoughtfully presented work that demonstrates the breadth and depth of the course of study.

• At least one extended collection of work, or project, based on an idea, concept, theme or issue which demonstrates the candidate’s ability to sustain work from an initial starting point to a realisation and includes evidence of their ability to research, develop ideas and link their work in a meaningful way to related critical/contextual materials.

• Critical/contextual work which could include written materials, such as journals, reviews, reflections and evaluations, annotations and historical background material. Examples of video, film, photographs, CD Roms and Powerpoint presentations may also be submitted. Evidence may also be included from the Internet, from books and journals, as well as studies made during a residency, site or gallery/museum visit. When appropriate sources should be identified and acknowledged.

• Sketchbooks, workbooks and journals. Alternatively, candidates may wish to present a series of related images on mounted sheets.

• The portfolio may, when appropriate to candidates’ chosen area of study, include examples of three-dimensional work, such as models, maquettes, sculptures and ceramic objects. There is no restriction in the scale of work produced but candidates should carefully select, organise and present work to ensure that they provide evidence of meeting all four assessment objectives. All work should be completed and marked to ensure that centre mark forms arrive at AQA and with moderators by the given deadline All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. This unit is set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June. 

Unit 2: Externally-Set Assignment

Topic list

An externally-set assignment. Separate question papers for each endorsement containing five exciting starting points. Candidates choose one.

Assessment

Externally-Set Assignment 80 marks
Weighting: 50% of total AS marks / 25% of total A Level marks

Supervised Time – 5 hours

Candidates select one of five starting points. The externally-set assignment will last from 1 February until the deadline for receipt of marks. Candidates may produce preparatory work and a finished piece or pieces or work of a wholly developmental nature. Candidates should be selective when deciding what to submit for this unit.

All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. Set by AQA, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

3.2 Unit 2 ARTA2, ARTB2, ARTC2, ARTD2, ARTE2, ARTF2

 Externally Set Assignment

 Assignment timings

• The emphasis of this unit will be the development of ideas.

• Separate questions will be set for each AS option.

These will consist of a choice of five questions to be used as starting points. Candidates are required to select one.

• Candidates will be provided with examination papers on 1 February, or as soon as possible after that.

• All work should be completed and marked to ensure that centre mark forms arrive at AQA and with moderators by the given deadline.

• Sketchbooks, workbooks and/or journals may be included; alternatively, work may be presented on mounted sheets or study sheets. When appropriate sources should be identified and acknowledged.

Supervised Time – 5 hours

• During the examination period, following a period of initial research candidates should undertake five hours of unaided, supervised time, the first two hours of which should be consecutive.

• The work produced during the five hours should be devoted to the development of ideas. It can take a variety of forms, such as drawings, photographs, computer-aided designs, maquettes, models and/or design sheets.

• Preparatory work may lead to a fully realised piece or pieces of two- or three-dimensions or to further work of a developmental nature. Candidates should be selective when deciding what to submit for this unit. All the work submitted for this unit will be marked as a whole. This is set by AQA, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

 A2 outline

The A2 specification has 2 units:

At A2, candidates are required to build upon the knowledge, understanding and skills gained in the AS with greater depth of study.

The A2 specification has 2 units:

Unit 3: Personal Investigation

 Topic list

 A personal investigation in which candidates develop work in response to an idea, issue, concept or theme of their choosing.

 Assessment

Coursework 80 marks
Weighting: 25% of total A Level marks

Candidates are required to develop a personal investigation based on an idea, issue, concept or theme supported by 1000 - 3000 words.

All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. Set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

 3.3 Unit 3 ARTA3, ARTB3, ARTC3, ARTD3, ARTE3, ARTF3

 Personal Investigation

• This a practical unit with written elements in which candidates are expected to develop a personal investigation based on an idea, issue, concept or theme leading to a finished piece or pieces.

• The practical elements should be linked with some aspect of contemporary or past practice of artists, designers or craftspeople.

• Candidates should be selective when deciding what to submit for this unit.

Quality of Written Communication

As the quality of written communication is an important aspect of this unit candidates should consider the following points:

• Written material of a critical, analytical nature can be included in a variety of forms, such as a personal study, a journal, a log, reports on gallery visits or an evaluation and reflection on candidates’ work and that of others.

• Written material should be no less than 1000 and no more than 3000 words.

• Sources should be identified and a bibliography and list of visits should be included.

• Candidates should demonstrate that they are aware of the discipline of working within given word counts.

Candidates must also:

• ensure that text is legible and spelling, punctuation and grammar are accurate so that meaning is clear

• select and use a form and style of writing appropriate to purpose and to complex subject matter

• organise information clearly and coherently, using specialist vocabulary when appropriate.

The personal Investigation will be assessed as a single unit. Evidence of addressing the Assessment Objectives must be provided in both visual and written elements and connections between these two elements should be clearly established. Sources should be identified and acknowledged. All work should be completed and marked to ensure that centre mark forms arrive at AQA and with moderators by the given deadline. All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. This unit is set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.it 4: Externally-Set Assignment

 

Topic list

 

  • An externally-set assignment. Separate question papers for each endorsement containing eight exciting starting points. Candidates choose one.

 

Assessment

 

Externally-Set Assignment 80 marks
Weighting: 25% of total A Level marks

 

Supervised Time – 15 hours

 

Towards the end of the examination period candidates must complete 15 hours of unaided, supervised time, the first three hours of which should be consecutive.

 

All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. Set by AQA, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

 

3.4 Unit 4 ARTA4, ARTB4, ARTC4, ARTD4, ARTE4, ARTF4

A2 Externally Set Assignment

Assignment timings

• Separate question papers will be set for each option. These will consist of a choice of eight questions to be used as starting points. Candidates are required to select one.

• Candidates will be provided with examination papers on 1 February, or as soon as possible after that.

• All work should be completed and marked to ensure that centre mark forms arrive at AQA and with moderators by the given deadline.

• Preparatory work should be submitted in any appropriate form, such as mounted sheets, study-sheets, sketchbooks, workbooks, journals, models and maquettes. When appropriate, sources should be identified and acknowledged.

Supervised Time – 15 hours

Towards the end of the examination period candidates should complete 15 hours of unaided and supervised time, the first 3 hours of which should be consecutive. Candidates should produce a clearly defined selection of work that makes up a whole, leading to a finished piece or pieces.

• Candidates will be assessed on their ability to work independently within the specific time constraints, developing a personal response, and addressing all four assessment objectives.

• Candidates should be selective when deciding what to submit for this unit. All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. This unit is set by AQA, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

 

AS/A2 ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES

The Assessment Objectives are common to AS and A Level. The assessment units will assess the following Assessment Objectives in the context of the content and skills set out in Section 3 (Subject Content).

AO1 Develop their ideas through sustained and focused investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and critical understanding.

AO2 Experiment with and select appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes, reviewing and refining their ideas as their work develops.

AO3 Record in visual and/or other forms ideas, observations and insights relevant to their intentions, demonstrating an ability to reflect on their work and progress

AO4 Present a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstrating critical understanding, realising intentions and, where appropriate, making connections between visual, written, oral or other elements.

Quality of making

The ability to handle materials, techniques and processes effectively and safely underpins all the Assessment Objectives. It is important in enabling candidates to develop a personal language, toexpress ideas and link their intentions to outcomes in a confident and assured manner.

Quality of Written Communication (QWC)

In GCE specifications which require candidates to produce written material in English candidates must:

• ensure that text is legible and that spelling, punctuation and grammar are accurate so that the meaning is clear

• select and use a form and style of writing appropriate to purpose and to complex subject matter

• organise information clearly and coherently, using specialist vocabulary when appropriate.

In this specification QWC will be assessed in Unit 3 by means of one or more of the four Assessment Objectives.

In Unit 3 candidates are required to produce written material linked to the practical project. This should take the form of:

• a practical project which is linked through the exploration of particular themes, concepts, ideas,issues or approaches with written work based on some aspect of critical, historical studies in art,craft or design related to the candidate’s practical work. Written work should be approximately 1000to 3000 words in length. The quality of written communication will be assessed through the four assessment objectives. It includes clarity of expression, the organisation and presentation of ideas, grammar, punctuation and spelling.

HOMEWORK POLICY

Homework is set on a regular basis and is expected to be completed and handed in on time, and to a reasonable standard, according to the abilities of the individual. It is intended to provide opportunity for continuation and reinforcement of class work, while promoting an independent understanding of current work. It provides an opportunity for students to practice the techniques taught, and to become more competent with the tools used to create artwork. It also provides opportunity for experimentation and exploring media, in their own environment.

Homework will be set fortnightly and some priority will be given to the practice of pencil drawing. Other type of homework will also be set relating to the current scheme of work. The department SOW (individual lesson plans) will have homework tasks written in for each year group. Homework types could include, collecting source material for a class work project, researching material in conjunction with individual/class/group project work or collecting information on an artist, craft worker, designer or movement. Homework time can also be used to complete work towards competition entries for internal or external agencies.

The art department will follow the college grading system of A – E and implement the new assessment policy.

Homework set should not normally demand of student’s excessive time input, although some students will wish to spend substantially more time than others. It is recommended that 30-40 minutes per week for years 7-9 will be a suitable time allocation.

Homework for GCSE and AS/A2 Level students will vary much more in content and media depending on the type of work being undertaken by the student. It will be much more flexible and often involve preparatory work to studies taking place in the classroom situation and individual research. However, weekly homework is set.

Art

Art

Art 1

ORGANISATION OF THE DEPARTMENT

The department consists of the following members of staff:

Mrs Kerry Amos – Head of Department (full time), responsible for:

  • Overall responsibility for Art and Design taught in the college
  • Aims and objectives
  • Formulating policy
  • Capitation
  • Discipline
  • Mentoring
  • Departmental administration
  • Departmental meetings
  • Public examinations
  • Implementation of the National Curriculum
  • Devising Schemes of Work for Ks 3,4 and 5
  • Ceramics specialism
  • Teaching KS 3 and 4
  • BTEC
  • Teaching 'A' Level students
  • Display
  • Literacy
  • Primary liaison
  • Able and Talented
  • Learning and Teaching group representative
  • Assessment
  • Analysis of data
  • ICT
  • Implementing new strategies

Mrs Nicola Crawford – Teacher of Art and Design (part time), responsible for:

  • Assistant to the Head of Department
  • Teaching KS3/4 students
  • Teaching 'A' Level students
  • Ceramics specialism
  • Numeracy
  • Display
  • Special Educational Needs
  • Assessment

Teacher of Music and Performing Arts. Responsible for:

  • Teaching year 7 and 9 students
  • Music specialism (has an A level in Art)
  • Assessment

Mr Brian Finney – Technician (1 day in art dept.), responsible for:

  • Preparation of equipment and materials
  • Organisation and maintenance of stock
  • Assisting in administrative tasks as appropriate
  • General assistance as deemed appropriate

ORGANISATION OF CLASSES/TEACHING GROUPS

Year 7 and 8 students are taught Art in their form classes.  Each member of the department generally teaches the same groups for the duration of the academic year.  However, it is sometimes beneficial to give another member of the department opportunity to teach an exam group, such as 'A' level.

ACCOMODATION

The department consists of two art rooms.  Both are used for 2D and 3D work, including ceramics. There are two storerooms and a kiln room.

RESOURCES

The department is equipped with ceramics equipment including an electric kiln, a pug machine, and a stone wedging slab.  There are also two electric mixers for glaze preparation.  Network cable points are available in both art areas and the department has 2 working computers, 2 printers, 2 lap tops, 2 Apple Mac book Pro's, 3 scanners.  Gimp, Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Painter XI, for both PC and Mac Book.  Other resources include ten display boards, papermaking facilities, 2 wax pots for batik, 1 sewing machine, 1 digital camera, 2 smart boards and a wide variety of materials such as paints, clay, inks etc.

All resources are the responsibility of the user and the Head of Department.  The resources will be used as and when appropriate within the department.

Curriculum aims of the department.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE ART DEPARTMENT

As appropriate, the aims and objectives of the Art Department relate directly to those of the college, and to the requirements of the National Curriculum.

'Art' should be interpreted throughout this document as 'Art, craft and design'.

AIMS:

1. To stimulate and/or maintain student curiosity, interest and enjoyment in Art.

2. To enable students to be familiar with a body of artistic knowledge, skills, principles and vocabulary, e.g. students should become competent and confident in:

i. producing images and 'works of art';

ii. responding to works produced by others, and to features of the natural and man-made environment, with reasoned arguments.

3. To employ teaching methods and resources that allow all students

(irrespective of their gender, ethnic origin, academic ability, etc.) to

have equal access to Art and to experience success and enjoyment in their work.

4. To develop an awareness in students of:

i. the implications of Art (past and present) for the individual and the local, national and international communities.

ii. the significance of Art and to value it as an important, pleasurable and fundamental realm of human experience.

5. To enable students to develop a range of desirable personal qualities such as safety awareness, politeness, perseverance, initiative and independence.

OBJECTIVES:

These objectives relate directly to the above aims and are intended to show how the aims are actually put into practice.

1. Staff should provide a variety of experiences/activities during a course of study.

2. The National Curriculum Key Stage 3 Orders and relevant GCSE/A Level requirements for art should be used as a basic core for the scheme of work. Staff should provide a glossary of words with eachtopic in order to aid correct spelling, understanding of the meanings of and the use of words.

- Staff should encourage students to recall and apply their knowledge and skills in both familiar and unfamiliar situations.

- The staff will allow opportunities at various times for group discussion.  At these times, we can listen to each other's views and hopefully reflect upon them.

- Students should be taught in a way that enables them to:

  • appreciate the diverse range of sources from which artists (craftspeople, designers) from different localities, generations and cultures derive their inspiration and ideas;
  • appreciate the qualities of various artistic materials so as to make appropriate selections when producing images and artefacts;
  • manipulate those materials, by the controlled use of suitable tools, equipment, techniques and processes, in order to produce intended effects;
  • experiment with and use knowledge of visual elements to design and make 'works of art' in a variety of media, genre and styles.  Their observations should be recorded.  Their work should display a variety of ideas and content.
  • Record and express their ideas and feelings as they perceive and respond to aspects of Art;
  • Recognise a variety of works and artists (craftspeople, designers) in the history of Art.
  • Understand some of the different criteria by which 'works of art' can be criticised and judged, and to employ those criteria when critically responding to, and making reasoned judgements about a variety of works from western and non-western cultures.

3. Lessons should be conducted in a secure, supportive and disciplined manner. The students and staff should interact in a manner that demonstrates mutual respect.

- Students should be introduced to a variety of experiences/activities during a course of study.  There should be opportunities for individual and/or group activities.

- Staff should use the rewards system to encourage students to work to their full potential and to experience a sense of achievement.

- Staff should attempt to spend time with each student during the course of a lesson.

- Students are to be encouraged to share their thoughts and experiences with others in order to enhance the quality of learning and use of subject specific language.

SCHEMES OF WORK

National Curriculum – Art and Design.

All schemes/units of work at KS3 reflect the guidelines and orders of the National Curriculum. As from 2007, all new schemes of work have ECM, Numeracy, Literacy and Citizenship embedded into them. (Many of these areas have been covered within past schemes of work but they will be made more obvious in the future) See SOW folders.

The scheme of work for KS3 is designed to enable pupils to progress in art and design from yr7 to yr 9.

The scheme builds on the knowledge, skills and understanding developed through the KS2 programme of study.  The expectation is that most pupils starting at KS3 are working at level 3, although the units take into account the fact that some pupils will be below or above that.

The department takes time to find out about pupil's experiences in art in primary schools by questioning the pupils.  We also give them base line testing in observational drawing skills and colour theory during the first term in yr 7 in week 2, as a starting point for them to monitor their progress.  This knowledge and understanding is assessed again at key points throughout the year.

At KS3, pupils develop their creativity and imagination through sustained activities that help them build on and improve their practical and critical skills.  They extend their knowledge and experience of materials, processes and practices.  They engage with art, craft and design in the contemporary world and from different times and cultures.  They become more independent in using the visual language to communicate their own ideas, feelings and meanings.

Below are extracts taken from the National Curriculum in Art and Design.

Curriculum aims

Learning and undertaking activities in art and design contribute to achievement of the curriculum aims for all young people to become:

  • successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve
  • confident individuals who are able to live safe, healthy and fulfilling lives
  • responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society.

The importance of Art and Design

In art, craft and design, pupils explore visual, tactile and other sensory experiences to communicate ideas and meanings. They work with traditional and new media, developing confidence, competence, imagination and creativity. They learn to appreciate and value images and artefacts across times and cultures, and to understand the contexts in which they were made. In art, craft and design, pupils reflect critically on their own and other people's work, judging quality, value and meaning. They learn to think and act as artists, craftspeople and designers, working creatively and intelligently. They develop an appreciation of art, craft and design, and its role in the creative and cultural industries that enrich their lives.

 

The Art and Design National Curriculum

1.Key concepts

There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of art, craft and design. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.

1.1 Creativity

  • Producing imaginative images, artefacts and other outcomes that are both original and of value.
  • Exploring and experimenting with ideas, materials, tools and techniques.
  • Taking risks and learning from mistakes.

1.2 Competence

  • Investigating, analysing, designing, making, reflecting and evaluating effectively.
  • Making informed choices about media, techniques and processes.

1.3 Cultural understanding

  • Engaging with a range of images and artefacts from different contexts, recognising the varied characteristics of different cultures and using them to inform their creating and making.
  • Understanding the role of the artist, craftsperson and designer in a range of cultures, times and contexts.

1.4 Critical understanding

  • Exploring visual, tactile and other sensory qualities of their own and others' work.
  • Engaging with ideas, images and artefacts, and identifying how values and meanings are conveyed.
  • Developing their own views and expressing reasoned judgements.
  • Analysing and reflecting on work from diverse contexts.

 

2. Key processes

These are the essential skills and processes in art, craft and design that pupils need to learn to make progress.

2.1 Explore and create

Pupils should be able to:

  • develop ideas and intentions by working from first-hand observation, experience, inspiration, imagination and other sources
  • investigate how to express and realise ideas using formal elements and the qualities of a range of media
  • make purposeful images and artefacts, selecting from a range of materials, techniques and processes
  • draw to express perception and invention, to communicate feelings, experiences and ideas, and for pleasure
  • explore and develop ideas using sketchbooks, journals and other appropriate strategies.

2.2 Understand and evaluate

Pupils should be able to:

  • use research and investigative skills appropriate to art, craft and design
  • appreciate how codes and conventions are used to convey ideas and meanings in and between different cultures and contexts
  • reflect on and evaluate their own and others' work, adapting and refining their own images and artefacts at all stages of the creative process
  • analyse, select and question critically, making reasoned choices when developing personal work
  • develop ideas and intentions when creating images and artefacts
  • organise and present their own material and information in appropriate forms.

 

3. Range and content

This section outlines the breadth of the subject on which teachers should draw when teaching the key concepts and key processes.

The study of art, craft and design should include:

  • work in, and across, the areas of fine art, craft and design, including both applied and fine art practices
  • exploration of media, processes and techniques in 2D, 3D and new technologies
  •  study of a range of artefacts from contemporary, historical, personal and cultural contexts
  • understanding of art, craft and design processes, associated equipment and safe working practices.

 

4. Curriculum opportunities

During the key stage pupils should be offered the following opportunities that are integral to their learning and enhance their engagement with the concepts, processes and content of the subject.

The curriculum should provide opportunities for pupils to:

  • work independently and collaboratively, taking different roles in teams
  • explore areas that are new to them, including ideas, techniques and processes
  • respond to the school's location and local cultural influences
  • engage with contemporary art, craft and design, working with creative and in creative environments where possible
  • work with a variety of genres, including contemporary practice
  • engage in interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary practice within the arts
  • make links between art and design and other subjects and areas of the curriculum.

 

National Curriculum

Level Indicators

Level 3

Pupils explore ideas and collect visual and other information for their work. They investigate visual and tactile qualities in materials and processes, communicate their ideas and meanings, and design and make images and artifacts for different purposes. They comment on similarities and differences between their own and others' work, and adapt and improve their own.

Level 4

Pupils use a variety of approaches to explore and experiment with ideas, information and resources in order to develop their intentions. They investigate and develop a range of practical skills and use the qualities of materials and processes purposefully to suit their intentions when designing and making. They compare and comment on differing ideas, methods and approaches used by artists, craftspeople and designers, relating these to the contexts in which the work was made.  They discuss their own work and that of others and consider how they might adapt and refine their ideas, skills and processes.

Level 5

Pupils take some creative risks when exploring, experimenting and responding to ideas and selecting information and resources in order to develop their work. When designing and making, they develop and use their technical knowledge and skills to manipulate the qualities of materials, processes and the formal elements appropriately. They consider and discuss the ideas, methods and approaches that are used by artists, craftspeople and designers, relating these to both context and purpose. They evaluate their own work and that of others, reflecting on their own view of its purpose and meaning. They are able to adapt and refine their ideas, processes and intentions.

Level 6

Pupils accept creative risks, exploring and experimenting with ideas independently and inventively and using a range of appropriate resources imaginatively to develop, design and make work. They apply their technical knowledge and skills to realise their intentions, using the qualities of materials, processes and the formal elements effectively. They interpret and explain how ideas and meanings are conveyed by artists, craftspeople and designers, recognising the varied characteristics of different historical, social and cultural contexts. They provide a reasoned evaluation of the  purpose and meaning of their own work and that of others. They use their critical understanding to develop their own views and practice.

Level 7

Pupils learn from taking creative risks that help them to form and develop their ideas and to create purposeful, imaginative work with some originality. They demonstrate confident understanding and use of materials, processes and the formal elements, combining these thoughtfully to realise their intentions. They analyse and comment on their own and others' work, appreciating how codes and conventions are used to express ideas in different genres, styles and traditions. They explain how and why their understanding of the work of others affects their own ideas, values and practice.

Level 8

Pupils develop, express and realise ideas in often original ways, confidently exploiting what they learn from taking creative risks and from their understanding of creative processes. They exploit the potential of materials and processes independently, making both intuitive and analytical judgements to develop and realise their intentions. They analyse, engage with, and question critically aspects of their own and others' work, identifying how beliefs, values and meanings are expressed and shared. They confidently express reasoned judgements about their own work and that of others, demonstrating analytical, critical and contextual understanding.

 

Exceptional performance

Pupils are in command of their creative practice, recognising and using a variety of strategies to develop ideas that are personal, original and imaginative. They use the differing qualities and potential of materials and processes with deliberation and maturity in order to create work that successfully fulfils their intentions. They critically engage with their own and others' work, identifying why ideas and meanings are subject to different interpretations and using their understanding to extend their thinking and practical work. They extend their ideas and sustain their investigations by responding to new possibilities and meanings. They communicate their own ideas, insights and views.

 

SCHEME OF WORK YEAR 7

GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO THE ART DEPARTMENT – YEAR 7

The general ability and prior experience of the pupils will be assessed using simple introductory topics and discussion, as mentioned previously.  One can expect a certain variability in standard and experience with pupils coming into the college from a variety of feeder schools, although this has declined as the effects of introducing the National Curriculum for Art in the feeder schools have made themselves felt.  Naturally there will still be substantial diversity of experience and expertise of the individual.

The first year will include the following:

  • Introduction to the department.
  • Introduction to department standards.
  • Safety aspects of the materials and equipment used within the department.
  • Drawing equipment and its potential.
  • An emphasis on the correct use of departmental material and the importance of a professional approach to the subject.
  • Each yr 7 student will be tested on their drawing ability and colour theory knowledge, at the beginning of term.  This will then be used to set targets against and to measure progression.
  • Importance will be placed on quality of work rather than quantity.
  • A reasonable amount of theoretical work will be covered within the practical lessons, and this may be reinforced with occasional written notes.
  • Students will be encouraged to experiment with a variety of media whilst developing expertise within a more limited range of media
  • The work of artists, craftspeople and designers will be introduced, linked to the practical work that takes place.
  • All pupils will be encouraged to work to the highest standard of which they are capable.  The nature of the work in this subject allows for great flexibility of differentiation between pupils of varying abilities.  Much of the teaching is on a one to one basis, which allows us to cater for the more able, as well as the least able whilst delivering the same/similar material to all.
  • Units of work will vary from single lessons to projects lasting up to a term.  These can be interlinked and will often develop as a result of pupils own ideas and needs.
  • Pupils will be encouraged to develop the use of art specific language and to engage in discussions relating to their own work and the work of others.
  •  Students will be encouraged to experiment with a variety of media whilst developing expertise within a more limited range of media
  • The work of artists, craftspeople and designers will be introduced, linked to the practical work that takes place.
  • All pupils will be encouraged to work to the highest standard of which they are capable.  The nature of the work in this subject allows for great flexibility of differentiation between pupils of varying abilities.  Much of the teaching is on a one to one basis, which allows us to cater for the more able, as well as the least able whilst delivering the same/similar material to all.
  • Units of work will vary from single lessons to projects lasting up to a term.  These can be interlinked and will often develop as a result of pupils own ideas and needs.
  • Pupils will be encouraged to develop the use of art specific language and to engage in discussions relating to their own work and the work of others.

 

 SCHEME OF WORK – YEAR 7

During the first year the basic elements of art will be considered a priority.  This will include -  tone, line, shape, texture, and colour.  These aspects will be included in:

  • Introduction to use of pencils and other drawing equipment and commencement of drawing techniques, e.g., tone – using the effects of light on 3D geometric type objects.
  • Introduction to painting materials, use of brush, paint etc. and commencement of painting techniques, e.g. Discussion of different types of equipment and the purposes that each is best suited for.
  • Introduction to use of colour theory and colour mixing with different types of media incorporated into the work.
  • Introduction of still life drawing, e.g. Commencing with basic shapes such as cubes, cylinders and spheres and later developing these structures into everyday objects.
  • Appropriate investigation into artists' works will be related to units.

 

Aspects of 3D (card construction, clay, etc.) will be explored and the course will include the basic knowledge required of materials and their working properties.  Health and safety precautions will play an integral role in the course.  Please see Scheme of Work documents.

 

SCHEME OF WORK YEAR 8 

Skills that have been learnt during year 7 will be further developed in year eight. New ideas and skills in a wide range of 2D and 3D media are to be introduced through the units of work, which can be seen in the department's 'Scheme of Work', folder. All aspects of the course relate to National Curriculum orders. There will also be opportunities for collaborative group work.

 

SCHEME OF WORK YEAR 9

As from 2006, those pupils who have opted to study Art have followed a Foundation Course (devised by the Art Department).  All aspects of the course still reflect the requirements of the National Curriculum.  For a detailed breakdown of the course see Yr 9 Foundation Course Scheme of Work.

The course allows pupils to take part in a series of workshop based projects whereby they will be able to experience and experiment with a diverse range of art, craft and design techniques and materials.  Many disciplines will be covered and a large range of work by practitioners will be used as inspiration.

This will build on pupils' previous experiences and also introduce new skills. As a result of this, it is anticipated that pupils will work with a higher level of understanding and increased confidence at GCSE level. Each project is designed to develop independent creative thinking skills, an aspect which will be vital to a successful GCSE. Students are assessed using the KS3 National Curriculum.

 

BTEC First Level 2 Art and Design

Extended Certificate and Certificate

 During the Autumn Term 2010-2011 the department introduced a BTEC course to all Year 9, 10 and 11 students. It was my vision that during year 9 and 10, Art students will complete the BTEC which is worth the equivalent of 2 GCSE’s. At the beginning of Year 11 students were to be offered the OCR GCSE course. Students who had not yet completed the BTEC would not be entered for OCR course as they needed to complete the BTEC course.

As the introduction of this course is in its infancy then we were very flexible with the students as we get to grips with the new criteria. We became a part of the Consortium for Stoke-on-Trent and were provided with appropriate projects. We began to deliver the course after the October half term 2010 to all 3 year groups. Head of Department attended other schools in the City to see examples of good practise and examples of Pass, Merit and Distinction work. This was regularly shared at consortium meetings. As a result of this first year’s trial, Mrs Amos joined the working party to improve the delivery of the course.

 

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Art and Design

(Equivalent to 1 GCSE grade)

15 Credits = 90- guided-learning-hours (GLH)

The qualification consists of one mandatory unit PLUS optional units that provide for a combined total of 15 credits (where at least 8 credits must be Level 2 or above).

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Art and Design
Unit

 

Credit Level
1 Contextual References in Art and Design 10 2
Unit Optional Units    
2 2D Visual Communication 5 2
3 3D Visual Communication 5 2

 

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Art and Design

 

(Equivalent to 2 GCSE grades)

30 Credits = 180- guided-learning-hours (GLH)

The qualification consists of three mandatory units PLUS optional units that provide for a combined total of 30 credits (where at least 16 credits must be Level 2 or above).

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Art and Design
Unit
Mandatory units
Credit
Level
1
Contextual References in Art and Design
10
2
2
2D Visual Communication
5
2
3
3D Visual Communication
5
2
Unit
Optional Units
 
 
4
Using Ideas to Explore, Develop and Produce Art and Design
10
2
5
Building an Art and Design Portfolio
5
2
6
Working in the Art and Design Industry
5
2
7
Working with Graphic Design Briefs
10
2
8
Working with Photography Briefs
10
2
9
Working with Fashion Design Briefs
10
2
10
Working with Textiles Briefs
10
2
11
Working with 3DDesign Briefs
10
2
12
Working with Interactive Media Briefs
10
2
13
Working with Visual Arts Briefs
10
2
14
Working with 3D Design Crafts Briefs
10
2
15
Working with Digital Art and Design Briefs
10
2
16
Working with Accessory Briefs
10
2
17
Working with Moving Image Briefs
10
2
18
Working with Site Specific Briefs
10
2

In BTEC Firsts, all units are internally assessed.

 All assessment for BTEC First qualifications is criterion referenced, based on the achievement of all the specified learning outcomes.

Each unit within the qualification has specified assessment and grading criteria which are to be used for grading purposes. A summative unit grade can be awarded at Pass, Merit or distinction:

  • To achieve a ‘pass’ a learner must have satisfied ALL the pass assessment criteria
  • To achieve a ‘merit’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the merit grading criteria
  • To achieve a ‘distinction’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the grading distinction criteria

Grading Domains

The assessment grading criteria are developed in relation to grading domains which are exemplified by a number of indicative characteristics at the level of the qualification.

There are four BTEC First grading domains:

  • Application of knowledge and understanding
  • Development of practical and technical skills
  • Personal development for occupational roles
  • Application of generic skills

SCHEME OF WORK – GCSE – YEARS 10 AND 11

All students opting for Art in years 10 and 11 will follow courses to GCSE examination standard. The course will include a more advanced development of the principles of Art already introduced in the previous years. The full content of the GCSE syllabus is laid out in the O.C.R Art and Design Syllabus, which is available from the Head of Art. We place more emphasis on ‘Independent Learning’ at this stage and endeavour to provide a course which is both challenging and accessible to all levels of ability.

Below are extracts from the OCR GCSE syllabus:

Aims and Learning Outcomes

The aims of these specifications are to encourage candidates to:

-Actively engage in the process of art and design in order to develop as effective and independent candidates and as critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds.

- Develop creative skills, through learning to use imagination and intuition when exploring and creating images and artefacts. Become confident in taking risks and learning from their mistakes when exploring and experimenting with ideas, materials, tools and techniques.

- Develop competence, with increasing independence, in refining and developing ideas and proposals, and personal outcomes or solutions. Learning to actively engage with the experience of working with a broad range of media, materials and techniques including, where appropriate, traditional and new media and technologies.

- Develop cultural knowledge, understanding and application of art, craft, design, media and technologies in historical and contemporary contexts, societies and cultures. Also, develop an understanding of the different roles, functions, audiences and consumers of art, craft and design practice.

- Develop critical understanding through investigative, analytical, experimental, interpretive, practical, technical and expressive skills.

- Develop personal attributes including self-confidence, resilience, perseverance, self-discipline and commitment.

 These specifications further provide opportunities for candidates to gain:

- a personal interest in why art and design matters and be inspired, moved and changed by studying a broad, coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study;

- experience of working within real and relevant frameworks;

- experience of the work practices of individuals, organisations and creative and cultural industries;

- understanding of art, craft and design processes and associated equipment and safe working practices.

The GCSE in Art and Design conforms to the regulations laid down within the Art and Design subject criteria (QCA 2007).

From September 2009 these GCSEs in Art and Design each require candidates to complete two mandatory units.

The GCSEs in Art and Design are organised into one unendorsed route (combining areas of study) and sevenspecialist focused areas of study (endorsements) as follows:

Fine Art

Graphic Communication

Photography – Lens- and Light-based Media

Textile Design

Three-dimensional Design

Critical and Contextual Studies

Applied

Candidates can take the unendorsed route if they want to submit work for more than one area of study. However candidates can choose one specialist focused endorsement if they want to restrict their research and outcome to one area of study.

Candidates may be entered for one or more Art and Design GCSEs. For example a candidate might choose to do two GCSEs such as the GCSE in Art and Design: Applied and the GCSE in Art and Design: Textile Design. Alternatively they might choose an unendorsed GCSE in Art and Design with the GCSE in Art and Design: Critical and Contextual Studies, and so on. Where candidates choose to take two separate GCSEs, they must submit separate supporting evidence and separate outcome(s) for each unit within each of the different GCSEs.

Course followed by students:

OCR GCSE in Art and Design: Fine Art

Unit 1: Art and Design Portfolio (A111)

Unit 2: Art and Design OCR-set Task (A121)

Unit 1 (A110 – A117): Art and Design Portfolio

 

                Candidates produce a portfolio of work developed from personal and/or centre-devised starting points, or briefs/projects/assignments within a client-focused context.

               The focus is on including work that shows exploration, research, acquisition of techniques and skills.

                This is produced under the Controlled Assessment conditions that are specified in Section 5.

                Candidates will be given up to a maximum of 45 hours in which to complete their Controlled Assessment portfolio.

 

Unit 2 (A120 – A127): Art and Design OCR-set Task

 

                Candidates select one question from an early release question paper to which they produce a personal response.

                Candidates will be given a period of time in which to plan and prepare as determined by the centre.

                Candidates will be given ten hours of controlled time in which to work on developing their ideas to outcome(s); at least one of the timetabled sessions must last for a minimum of three hours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 1 (A110 – A117): Art and Design Portfolio

Candidates need to produce a portfolio of work for this unit that demonstrates a personal response to starting points, briefs, scenarios or stimuli. Centres must set their own starting points, briefs, scenarios or stimuli. OCR-produced exemplar material is provided to help centres design and set their own starting points, briefs, scenarios or stimuli but this material must not be used for assessment purposes.

A portfolio is formed from work that is produced in response to the candidate’s chosen starting point, brief, scenario or stimulus. The portfolio should be produced using the Controlled Assessment conditions outlined in Section 5. Candidates’ work within the portfolio should provide evidence of meeting all assessment objectives; this includes research, preparatory and developmental studies and their outcome(s).

For the purposes of assessment, candidates will provide evidence of all the assessment objectives through the careful selection and presentation of their work. The portfolio should be viewed as a whole and judgements regarding the extent to which all of the assessment objectives have been met should be made across the portfolio as a whole.

The portfolio will consist of a sustained project, theme or course of study. It may be presented in an appropriate format for the area of study using, for example, annotated sketchbooks, mounted sheets, maquettes, prototypes, scale models or written work.

Unit 2 (A120 – A127): Art and Design OCR-set Task

The OCR-set Task

For this unit, an early release question paper will be dispatched to centres based on provisional entries made, and will also be available on the OCR website in January. This paper can be given to candidates at the discretion of centres any time on or after 1 January. Centres may determine the amount of time for preparatory study prior to candidates undertaking their supervised, ten-hour set task.

The OCR-set task will give candidates a choice of questions in the form of written and/or visual starting points, briefs, scenario or stimuli. From this paper, candidates are expected to choose one question for which they will generate an appropriate personal response for assessment and moderation. Please see the Specimen Assessment Material for an example of the OCR-set task.

Planning and Preparation

Candidates must be given a preparatory period during which they will research, plan and develop ideas for their own personal response to the starting point or brief they have chosen. During this time teachers may give limited guidance. Guidance should be given to candidates about availability and choice of materials, health and safety, avoidance of plagiarism and completion of work in accordance with specification requirements and procedures. However, it should be remembered that candidates are required to reach their own judgements and conclusions and must work independently to produce their own personal response. The majority of work should be carried out in the centre during normal teaching time.

All work must be completed by the designated finishing time set by the centre. This deadline, along with dates and deadlines for preparatory work and the supervised ten-hour OCR-set task must be set by centres in order to facilitate the completion of marking and internal standardisation by the 15 May deadline.

Realising intentions

Candidates will have up to ten hours in which to independently realise their personal response. The ten hours can be divided into a number of sessions and timetabled to suit the centre; at least one of the timetabled sessions must last for a minimum of three hours. Centres should ensure that the most appropriate approach to these supervised periods of sustained focus is adopted. Very short sessions should be avoided. Candidates must not have access to their work between sessions, nor once the ten hours of timed assessment have been completed. For regulations governing examinations, centres should consult the OCR Administration Guide for General Qualifications, or the JCQ document, General and Vocational Qualifications: Instructions for Conducting Examinations.

Candidates are required to provide evidence of all assessment objectives in response to their chosen starting point, brief, scenario or stimulus, within a supervised ten-hour time limit. It is expected that during this supervised ten-hour period, candidates will realise their intentions to an outcome; this may be a potential solution, a maquette or prototype, or a finished piece. All work produced for the OCR-set task, including the research, planning and development work produced in the preparatory period must be submitted for assessment and moderation.

Presenting the personal response

Candidates are expected to evidence all of the assessment objectives whilst producing work for this unit. Candidates should select and present their own work for assessment purposes from the work that they have undertaken in response to this unit.

Candidates must observe certain procedures in the production of their personal response for the externally-set task.

• Any source material must be suitably acknowledged.

• Quotations must be clearly marked and a reference provided wherever possible.

• Work submitted for assessment and moderation should be labelled clearly with:

Centre number and name

Candidate number and name

Unit code

Title of candidate’s work indicating the starting point, brief, scenario or stimulus chosen

Outcome(s) clearly identified.

Assessment and Moderation

In order to assess personal responses produced during the supervised ten-hour period, assessors must be able to authenticate candidates’ work. Centres are advised to ensure that candidates have been informed about the avoidance of plagiarism and completion of work in accordance with specification requirements and procedures.

Authentication

Assessors must be confident that the work they mark is the candidate’s own. This does not mean that a candidate must be supervised throughout the completion of all work but the teacher must exercise sufficient supervision, or introduce sufficient checks, to be in a position to authenticate a candidate’s work.

Assessors should ensure that candidates are aware that they must not submit work for assessment that is not their own or lend their work to other candidates. Plagiarism is the submission of another’s work as one’s own and/or failure to acknowledge the source correctly. Plagiarism is considered to be malpractice and could lead to the candidate being disqualified. Plagiarism sometimes occurs innocently when candidates are unaware of the need to reference or acknowledge their sources. It is therefore important that centres ensure that candidates understand that the work they submit must be their own and that they understand the meaning of plagiarism and what penalties may be applied. Candidates may refer to research, quotations or evidence but they must list their sources. The rewards from acknowledging sources, and the credit they will gain from doing so, should be emphasised to candidates as well as the potential risks of failing to acknowledge such material. Candidates should be asked to sign a declaration to confirm that the work they submit is their own; this should be kept securely by the centre. Assessors should reinforce this message to ensure candidates understand what is expected of them.

Candidates’ work for Unit 2 (A120 – A127): Art and Design OCR-set Task should be marked by the centre assessor according to the marking criteria, using a ‘best fit’ approach. The award of marks must be directly related to the marking criteria. Centre assessors use their professional judgement in selecting the descriptor that best describes the work of the candidate to place them within the appropriate band for each assessment objective strand. Marks should then be awarded as outlined below.

Where the candidate’s work

convincingly meets the descriptor, the highest mark within the band should be awarded

adequately meets the descriptor, the most appropriate mark in the middle range of the band should be awarded

just meets the descriptor, the lowest mark in the band should be awarded

fails to meet any aspect of the descriptor within the lowest band then zero marks should be awarded.

The candidate’s final mark is out of a total of 100 and is arrived at by totalling the marks awarded for each assessment objective.

Assessment and internal standardisation needs to be completed in time to submit marks to OCR by the deadline of 15 May. Once marked, and internally standardised, all work must be retained by the centre for the external moderation visit. All candidate work must be retained securely within the centre until candidates’ results are issued and the centre is certain that no Result Enquiry or Appeal process is required.

Use of New Media

Any of OCR’s Art and Design GCSEs can be approached using traditional media, new media or a combination of both, providing all assessment objectives are met. Candidates may explore the possibilities of using new media and use new media where appropriate within the work they develop and produce.

 

Many artists and designers now use new media to develop ideas and produce work, particularly those who work commercially. Such artists and designers, along with the processes and techniques they use, might be usefully explored by candidates. This might be achieved by accessing online galleries, having access to appropriate hardware and software, exploring the possibilities of e-portfolio use, visits to commercial art and design departments or by inviting visiting speakers such as local artists and designers or employees from local art and design companies.

Candidates may produce and submit practical work for Unit A120: Art and Design OCR-set Task that shows evidence of their work in one of their chosen areas of study.

Candidates taking the combined areas of study route should be encouraged to explore processes, materials and techniques that are appropriate to the chosen areas of study, in a range of practical ways. Candidates could work in a multimedia way: for example, their portfolio could reflect the relationship between figurative drawing and painting and graphic design (combining Fine Art and Graphic Communication), or photographic portraits and fabric design (combining Photography – Lens- and Light-based Media with Textile Design).

At least two areas of study must be evident in a candidate’s outcome(s), as well as their preparatory work. A candidate could submit one outcome that incorporates two different areas of study. Alternatively, a candidate could submit two or more final outcomes each focusing on one of their chosen areas of study, linked by a common theme or stimulus.

Fine Art

OCR GCSE in Art and Design: Fine Art – J161

Classification Code 3690

In response to their chosen activities in Fine Art, candidates will be expected to demonstrate skills through their response to their chosen starting point, scenario or stimulus. A variety of processes and techniques can be explored when using differing approaches to making images and/or objects.

Candidates should demonstrate an expressive and personal response in their work, appropriate for the given task or stimuli, from two or more of the activities listed below.

Painting: Candidates should explore the use of tone, colour, composition, materials and context. Candidates can show this through the use of various processes and media, such as inks, acrylic, watercolour or oil paints.

Drawing: Candidates should be encouraged, to work from direct observation to explore drawing using line and tone. They should also be encouraged to explore a wide variety of drawing materials using different surfaces. Drawing materials might include pastel, pencil, pen and ink, paint, charcoal or other materials.

Printmaking: Candidates should explore a variety of printmaking techniques and produce either a series of related images or one-off prints using methods such as linocut, etching, monoprinting, or screen printing.

Sculpture: Candidates should explore form, space, mass and volume. They should use a range of processes and materials such as carving, modelling, casting, or constructing.

Lens-based imagery: Candidates should explore approaches to the production of still and/or moving images using appropriate techniques, processes and equipment such as traditional dark room methods, digital photography, image manipulation, film, animation, or other new media.

Other forms of two-dimensional or three-dimensional imagery: Using traditional or new media, candidates can also produce work for assessment in any other 2D or 3D form such as collage, assemblage, or textiles. Candidates may employ mixed media or use of improvised or waste materials for collage or constructional purposes to create work.

ICT

In order to play a full part in modern society, candidates need to be confident and effective users of ICT. Where appropriate, candidates should be given opportunities to use ICT in order to further their study of art and design.

The assessment of this course allows candidates to use ICT if appropriate. Where candidates have used ICT they are expected to:

• Present evidence that clearly shows any appropriate use of ICT for research purposes, such as visiting gallery web sites and the use of CD-ROMs

• Provide clear evidence of the use of ICT to further develop their own work through use of commercial software, for activities such as:

Image creation (still and moving image)

Image manipulation (still and moving image)

Digital photography (still and moving image)

Electronic storage and retrieval.

Where candidates have not created the initial source material themselves, clear reference should be made as to its original source, for example:

Clip art

Imagery downloaded from the internet

Scanning from secondary sources.

 

4.1 GCSE Art and Design Scheme of Assessment

Unit 1 (A110 – A117): Art and Design Portfolio

 

 

60% of the total GCSE Art and Design marks

Controlled Assessment

 

Maximum of 45 hrs to complete the portfolio

 

100 marks

 

 

For this unit a candidate needs to produce a portfolio of work showing their personal response to either a starting point, brief, scenario, or stimulus devised and provided by the centre.

Candidates have up to 45 hours in which to produce their portfolio.

This unit is internally assessed and externally moderated by OCR.

Unit 2 (A120 – A127): Art and Design OCR-set Task

 

 

 

40% of the total GCSE Art and Design marks

Question paper issued to candidates on or after 1 January

 

 

Unlimited preparatory period

10 hrs supervised OCR-set task

 

 

 

100 marks

The early release question paper will be issued in January and will provide candidates with a range of written and visual starting points, briefs, scenarios and stimuli. From these one must be selected upon which to base their personal response.

Candidates will have a preparatory period determined by the centre, followed by a supervised ten-hour period in which to complete their personal response outcome(s). One timetabled session must last for at least 3 hours.

This unit is internally assessed and externally moderated by OCR.

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade Descriptions

Grade descriptions are provided to give a general indication of the standards of achievement likely to have been shown by candidates awarded particular grades. The descriptions must be interpreted in relation to the content in the specification; they are not designed to define that content. The grade awarded will depend in practice upon the extent to which the candidate has met the assessment objectives overall. Shortcomings in some aspects of the assessment may be balanced by better performance in others.

The grade descriptors have been produced by the regulatory authorities in collaboration with the awarding bodies.

Grade F

Candidates develop and explore ideas through experimentation. They make an attempt to analyse and evaluate images, artefacts and products, and in their responses show evidence of a modest understanding of culture and context.  

They make an attempt to refine and modify their work as it progresses. They use media, material, techniques and processes with some control and understanding. They demonstrate some ability to combine the knowledge, skills and understanding they have developed.

They select and record observations in a direct way and draw upon their experiences.

They present ideas with a basic understanding of the links between form and intention. They make a personal response, endeavouring to realise intentions, and seek to make connections between their own work and that of others.

Grade C

Candidates effectively develop and explore ideas through considered investigations. They analyse and evaluate images, artefacts and products with a clear sense of purpose. They demonstrate a suitably broad understanding of context and culture, which inform developing responses.

They refine their ideas and select and employ a range of resources, media, material, techniques and processes appropriately. They combine their knowledge, skills and understanding in a generally appropriate and accomplished manner. They understand the relationship between process and product, and demonstrate growing ability to review, modify and refine their work as it progresses.

They demonstrate the necessary skills to effectively record and respond to observations and experiences.

They present ideas and the results of their research and enquiry competently in forms that are consistent with intentions. They make connections with the work of others, which inform personal responses and support the realisation of intentions.

Grade A

Candidates creatively develop and explore ideas through investigations. They sustain related activity perceptively and effectively analyse and evaluate images, artefacts and products. Responses, interpretations and subsequent developments are thoughtfully informed by an understanding of culture and context.

They thoughtfully develop and refine their ideas through experimentation, confidently manipulating and exploiting a wide range of relevant resources, media, material, techniques and processes. They combine their knowledge, skills and understanding in resourceful, discriminating and purposeful ways. Significant relationships are established between process and product through continuing evaluation, planning and modification as their work progresses.

They sensitively and skilfully record ideas and interpret observations and experiences.

They present imaginative and personal responses, communicating the results of thorough research and enquiry in appropriate forms that clearly relate to and facilitate the realisation of intentions. They make perceptive and informed connections between personal lines of enquiry and the work of others.

SCHEME OF WORK – AS/A2 LEVEL – YEARS 12 AND 13

All candidates opting for AS/A2 level Art and Design will follow the AQA syllabus. Students will be expected to produce units of work similar to those required at GCSE level, but developed to a much higher level. There will also be a written element, which is a compulsory requirement of the course.

With the increased amount of work and time spent in the department, the candidates will be expected to develop their own personal style, professional ability, skill and ability to work independently producing regular quantities of high quality work, including work that is done in their own time. Students are welcome to be in the art rooms at any time when there is sufficient space for them to work. They are also expected to spend one extra study per week engaged in art related activities.

Both AS and A2 students took part in a visit to London this year. They visited the Victoria and Albert Museum and Tate Modern. We felt that it was a super opportunity to give students first hand experiences with both very modern art and that of a more craft based nature. All students complete a sketchbook/journal of their visit and how the visit will influence their own development.

The following is taken from the AQA specification

3.7 Art, Craft and Design (ARTA)

Introduction

Candidates should be introduced to a variety of experiences exploring a range of two- and/or three dimensional media, processes and techniques. They should be made aware of both traditional and new technologies.

Candidates should explore relevant images, artefacts and resources relating to a range of art, craft and design, from the past and from recent times, including European and non-European examples. This should be integral to the investigating and making process. Their responses to these examples must be shown through practical and critical activities which demonstrate the candidates’ understanding of different styles, genres and traditions.

Candidates should be aware of the four assessment objectives to be demonstrated in the context of the content and skills presented and of the importance of process as well as product.

Candidates should explore drawing using a variety of methods and media on a variety of scales.

Candidates should use sketchbooks/workbooks/ journals to underpin their work where appropriate.

 Areas of Study

Candidates are required to work in at least two of the following areas of Art and Design. They may explore overlapping areas and combinations of areas.

  • Fine Art
  • Graphic Communication
  •  Textile Design
  •  Three-Dimensional Design
  •  Photography: lens-based and light-based media

Skills and Techniques

Candidates will be expected to demonstrate skills, as defined in Section 3.5 of this specification, in the context of their chosen areas of study. Candidates will work in at least two areas drawn from the following:

Fine Art: painting; drawing; mixed media, sculpture; land art; installation; printmaking; film; animation; television; video and photography: lens-based and light-based media. (See also Section 3.8.)

SKETCHBOOKS

The use of sketchbooks is seen as an important part of AS/A2 work. They enable you to build a personal engagement with the subject. They can be used in a variety of ways, including:

  • for recording what is seen, remembered or imagined
  • for close observation or analysis
  • for exploring and resolving problems
  • for personal evaluations of your work and artist’s work
  • for recording events and situations
  • as a two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional form
  • for making proposals
  • as a visual and written diary
  • for jotting down ideas quickly
  • as a collection of images

 The following Aims and Assessment Objectives are taken from the AQA Specification booklet.

AIMS

The aims identify the educational purposes of AS and A Level Art and Design. They are the same for both AS and A Level.

A course based on this specification should encourage candidates to develop:

a)intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive powers;

b)investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills, aesthetic understanding and critical judgement;

c)an understanding of the interrelationships between art, craft and design and an awareness of the contexts in which they operate;

d)knowledge and understanding of art, craft and design in contemporary society and in other times and cultures.

GCE Art and Design (2200) 

Important notice – July 2008

The AS and A Level certification codes for the new GCE Art and Design (2200) specification have changed as follows:

 

Page 4

AS Award:

1201A–1206F

A Level award:

2201A–2206F

Page 23

AS certification:

1201A, 1202B, 1203C, 1204D, 1205E and 1206F

A Level certification:

2201A, 2202B, 2203C, 2204D, 2205E and 2206F

 

Introduction

 Introducing AQA's new course specification for Art and Design for AS and A Level. This new specification has been designed to:

  • enable candidates to develop personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences, environments and cultures
  • extend the existing flexibility to allow students and teachers to work from their strengths
  • provide an appropriate foundation for further study of Art and Design or related subjects in Higher Education 

The following information and specification outline will enable both practising Teachers and Subject Heads to be better informed and supported in the teaching of this subject, particularly if attending one of AQA's Teacher Support meetings. 

Classification Codes

Every specification is assigned a national classification codes indicating the subject area to which it belongs. The classification code for this specification are:

  • Art and Design 3510

Centres should be aware that candidates who enter for more than one GCE AS/A level qualification with the same classification code will have only one grade (the highest) counted for the purpose of the School and College Performance Tables.

Centres may wish to advise candidates that, if they take two specifications with the same classification code, universities and employers are very likely to take the view that they have achieved only one of the two GCE AS/A levels. The same view may be taken if candidates take two GCE AS/A level specifications that have different classification codes but have significant overlap of content. Candidates who have any doubts about their subject combinations should check with the university to which they wish to progress or company they wish to join, before embarking on their programmes.

The AS outline

The AS specification has 2 units:

it 1 Portfolio

Topic list

Development of a coursework portfolio exemplifying work carried out during the AS course.

Assessment

Coursework 80 marks
Weighting: 50% of total AS marks / 25% of total A Level marks

Candidates choose one of the endorsements for study throughout AS. The contents of the Portfolio will be determined by the nature of the course of study.

Candidates should produce a collection of materials which exemplifies work carried out during the AS course.

All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole.

Set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

3.1 Unit 1 ARTA1, ARTB1, ARTC1, ARTD1, ARTE1, ARTF1

Coursework Portfolio

Candidates choose one of the endorsements for study throughout AS. The contents of the Portfolio will be determined by the nature of the course of study.

Candidates should produce a collection of materials which exemplifies work carried out during the AS course.

Candidates may submit in their portfolio:

• A selection of thoughtfully presented work that demonstrates the breadth and depth of the course of study.

• At least one extended collection of work, or project, based on an idea, concept, theme or issue which demonstrates the candidate’s ability to sustain work from an initial starting point to a realisation and includes evidence of their ability to research, develop ideas and link their work in a meaningful way to related critical/contextual materials.

• Critical/contextual work which could include written materials, such as journals, reviews, reflections and evaluations, annotations and historical background material. Examples of video, film, photographs, CD Roms and Powerpoint presentations may also be submitted. Evidence may also be included from the Internet, from books and journals, as well as studies made during a residency, site or gallery/museum visit. When appropriate sources should be identified and acknowledged.

• Sketchbooks, workbooks and journals. Alternatively, candidates may wish to present a series of related images on mounted sheets.

• The portfolio may, when appropriate to candidates’ chosen area of study, include examples of three-dimensional work, such as models, maquettes, sculptures and ceramic objects. There is no restriction in the scale of work produced but candidates should carefully select, organise and present work to ensure that they provide evidence of meeting all four assessment objectives. All work should be completed and marked to ensure that centre mark forms arrive at AQA and with moderators by the given deadline All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. This unit is set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June. 

Unit 2: Externally-Set Assignment

Topic list

An externally-set assignment. Separate question papers for each endorsement containing five exciting starting points. Candidates choose one.

Assessment

Externally-Set Assignment 80 marks
Weighting: 50% of total AS marks / 25% of total A Level marks

Supervised Time – 5 hours

Candidates select one of five starting points. The externally-set assignment will last from 1 February until the deadline for receipt of marks. Candidates may produce preparatory work and a finished piece or pieces or work of a wholly developmental nature. Candidates should be selective when deciding what to submit for this unit.

All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. Set by AQA, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

3.2 Unit 2 ARTA2, ARTB2, ARTC2, ARTD2, ARTE2, ARTF2

 Externally Set Assignment

 Assignment timings

• The emphasis of this unit will be the development of ideas.

• Separate questions will be set for each AS option.

These will consist of a choice of five questions to be used as starting points. Candidates are required to select one.

• Candidates will be provided with examination papers on 1 February, or as soon as possible after that.

• All work should be completed and marked to ensure that centre mark forms arrive at AQA and with moderators by the given deadline.

• Sketchbooks, workbooks and/or journals may be included; alternatively, work may be presented on mounted sheets or study sheets. When appropriate sources should be identified and acknowledged.

Supervised Time – 5 hours

• During the examination period, following a period of initial research candidates should undertake five hours of unaided, supervised time, the first two hours of which should be consecutive.

• The work produced during the five hours should be devoted to the development of ideas. It can take a variety of forms, such as drawings, photographs, computer-aided designs, maquettes, models and/or design sheets.

• Preparatory work may lead to a fully realised piece or pieces of two- or three-dimensions or to further work of a developmental nature. Candidates should be selective when deciding what to submit for this unit. All the work submitted for this unit will be marked as a whole. This is set by AQA, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

 A2 outline

The A2 specification has 2 units:

At A2, candidates are required to build upon the knowledge, understanding and skills gained in the AS with greater depth of study.

The A2 specification has 2 units:

Unit 3: Personal Investigation

 Topic list

 A personal investigation in which candidates develop work in response to an idea, issue, concept or theme of their choosing.

 Assessment

Coursework 80 marks
Weighting: 25% of total A Level marks

Candidates are required to develop a personal investigation based on an idea, issue, concept or theme supported by 1000 - 3000 words.

All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. Set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

 3.3 Unit 3 ARTA3, ARTB3, ARTC3, ARTD3, ARTE3, ARTF3

 Personal Investigation

• This a practical unit with written elements in which candidates are expected to develop a personal investigation based on an idea, issue, concept or theme leading to a finished piece or pieces.

• The practical elements should be linked with some aspect of contemporary or past practice of artists, designers or craftspeople.

• Candidates should be selective when deciding what to submit for this unit.

Quality of Written Communication

As the quality of written communication is an important aspect of this unit candidates should consider the following points:

• Written material of a critical, analytical nature can be included in a variety of forms, such as a personal study, a journal, a log, reports on gallery visits or an evaluation and reflection on candidates’ work and that of others.

• Written material should be no less than 1000 and no more than 3000 words.

• Sources should be identified and a bibliography and list of visits should be included.

• Candidates should demonstrate that they are aware of the discipline of working within given word counts.

Candidates must also:

• ensure that text is legible and spelling, punctuation and grammar are accurate so that meaning is clear

• select and use a form and style of writing appropriate to purpose and to complex subject matter

• organise information clearly and coherently, using specialist vocabulary when appropriate.

The personal Investigation will be assessed as a single unit. Evidence of addressing the Assessment Objectives must be provided in both visual and written elements and connections between these two elements should be clearly established. Sources should be identified and acknowledged. All work should be completed and marked to ensure that centre mark forms arrive at AQA and with moderators by the given deadline. All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. This unit is set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.it 4: Externally-Set Assignment

 

Topic list

 

  • An externally-set assignment. Separate question papers for each endorsement containing eight exciting starting points. Candidates choose one.

 

Assessment

 

Externally-Set Assignment 80 marks
Weighting: 25% of total A Level marks

 

Supervised Time – 15 hours

 

Towards the end of the examination period candidates must complete 15 hours of unaided, supervised time, the first three hours of which should be consecutive.

 

All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. Set by AQA, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

 

3.4 Unit 4 ARTA4, ARTB4, ARTC4, ARTD4, ARTE4, ARTF4

A2 Externally Set Assignment

Assignment timings

• Separate question papers will be set for each option. These will consist of a choice of eight questions to be used as starting points. Candidates are required to select one.

• Candidates will be provided with examination papers on 1 February, or as soon as possible after that.

• All work should be completed and marked to ensure that centre mark forms arrive at AQA and with moderators by the given deadline.

• Preparatory work should be submitted in any appropriate form, such as mounted sheets, study-sheets, sketchbooks, workbooks, journals, models and maquettes. When appropriate, sources should be identified and acknowledged.

Supervised Time – 15 hours

Towards the end of the examination period candidates should complete 15 hours of unaided and supervised time, the first 3 hours of which should be consecutive. Candidates should produce a clearly defined selection of work that makes up a whole, leading to a finished piece or pieces.

• Candidates will be assessed on their ability to work independently within the specific time constraints, developing a personal response, and addressing all four assessment objectives.

• Candidates should be selective when deciding what to submit for this unit. All the work produced for this unit will be marked as a whole. This unit is set by AQA, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA by visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

 

AS/A2 ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES

The Assessment Objectives are common to AS and A Level. The assessment units will assess the following Assessment Objectives in the context of the content and skills set out in Section 3 (Subject Content).

AO1 Develop their ideas through sustained and focused investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and critical understanding.

AO2 Experiment with and select appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes, reviewing and refining their ideas as their work develops.

AO3 Record in visual and/or other forms ideas, observations and insights relevant to their intentions, demonstrating an ability to reflect on their work and progress

AO4 Present a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstrating critical understanding, realising intentions and, where appropriate, making connections between visual, written, oral or other elements.

Quality of making

The ability to handle materials, techniques and processes effectively and safely underpins all the Assessment Objectives. It is important in enabling candidates to develop a personal language, toexpress ideas and link their intentions to outcomes in a confident and assured manner.

Quality of Written Communication (QWC)

In GCE specifications which require candidates to produce written material in English candidates must:

• ensure that text is legible and that spelling, punctuation and grammar are accurate so that the meaning is clear

• select and use a form and style of writing appropriate to purpose and to complex subject matter

• organise information clearly and coherently, using specialist vocabulary when appropriate.

In this specification QWC will be assessed in Unit 3 by means of one or more of the four Assessment Objectives.

In Unit 3 candidates are required to produce written material linked to the practical project. This should take the form of:

• a practical project which is linked through the exploration of particular themes, concepts, ideas,issues or approaches with written work based on some aspect of critical, historical studies in art,craft or design related to the candidate’s practical work. Written work should be approximately 1000to 3000 words in length. The quality of written communication will be assessed through the four assessment objectives. It includes clarity of expression, the organisation and presentation of ideas, grammar, punctuation and spelling.

HOMEWORK POLICY

Homework is set on a regular basis and is expected to be completed and handed in on time, and to a reasonable standard, according to the abilities of the individual. It is intended to provide opportunity for continuation and reinforcement of class work, while promoting an independent understanding of current work. It provides an opportunity for students to practice the techniques taught, and to become more competent with the tools used to create artwork. It also provides opportunity for experimentation and exploring media, in their own environment.

Homework will be set fortnightly and some priority will be given to the practice of pencil drawing. Other type of homework will also be set relating to the current scheme of work. The department SOW (individual lesson plans) will have homework tasks written in for each year group. Homework types could include, collecting source material for a class work project, researching material in conjunction with individual/class/group project work or collecting information on an artist, craft worker, designer or movement. Homework time can also be used to complete work towards competition entries for internal or external agencies.

The art department will follow the college grading system of A – E and implement the new assessment policy.

Homework set should not normally demand of student’s excessive time input, although some students will wish to spend substantially more time than others. It is recommended that 30-40 minutes per week for years 7-9 will be a suitable time allocation.

Homework for GCSE and AS/A2 Level students will vary much more in content and media depending on the type of work being undertaken by the student. It will be much more flexible and often involve preparatory work to studies taking place in the classroom situation and individual research. However, weekly homework is set.